Information for Faculty

To The Faculty

Information for Faculty Offering Instruction in Arts and Sciences is intended to serve as a convenient reference for the educational policies of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). In addition to a discussion of instructors’ responsibilities, matters related to course administration, and problems often encountered by students, this publication includes a summary of teaching resources available to instructors and a detailed academic calendar.

All members of the FAS are urged to consult this publication as issues arise in the administration of their courses and in their work with students. New members of the FAS will, it is hoped, take time to acquaint themselves with all aspects of this publication and especially with the various policies and regulations that are particular to Harvard. Avoiding misunderstandings before the fact can save valuable time and spare unnecessary embarrassment.

For example, it is important to understand that while graduate students may receive a grade of Incomplete, undergraduates cannot. In the matter of an extension of time, instructors may offer undergraduates an extension of time to complete course work until the end of the Examination Period; however, only with the express permission of the Administrative Board of Harvard College may instructors accept undergraduate work after the end of the Examination Period. Final and approved makeup examinations are scheduled by the staff of the Office of the Registrar. Instructors may not excuse a student from the final examination or make special arrangements to administer the exam at a time other than that scheduled by the Registrar. Any student absent from a regularly scheduled exam is given the grade of ABS, a failing grade. Instructors should be in residence throughout the academic year, including the Reading and Examination Periods. Short absences require approval of the department chair; absences of more than one week must be approved by the Dean of the Faculty. Exclusion from a course, grade changes, and the retention of blue examination booklets constitute further areas to which new faculty members are urged to give special attention.

Introduction

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences includes Harvard College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. As with each of the nine faculties of the University, the chief administrative officer of the FAS is its Dean. The Dean oversees both financial and academic planning for the Faculty as well as its many libraries, museums, laboratories, and centers.* The Dean is advised by an eighteen-member Faculty Council elected by and from the officers of the FAS.

Distinguishing features of Harvard College that involve the direct participation of faculty members are the House System, the Program in General Education, and the Freshman Seminar Program.

The House System

From the beginning of his presidency, A. Lawrence Lowell aspired to create a residential system for Harvard College modeled on Oxford and Cambridge Universities. In 1928 the generous gift of a Yale alumnus, Edward S. Harkness, made that ambition a reality. Three entirely new Houses were constructed and four others created from existing residential halls, establishing the nucleus of the current House system.

All Harvard students have a residentially-based affiliation. The first-year students live in dormitories located within or adjacent to Harvard Yard. During their first year in the College they are advised by the Resident Deans of First-Year Students, housed in the First Year Experience Office, a unit within the Dean of Students Office (DSO). Most upperclassmen live in the Houses, each of which also affords a dining room, a library, and a variety of activities designed to foster the easy mix of social and intellectual life that President Lowell envisaged for the House system. For example, the Houses may offer seminars for course credit. They routinely sponsor language tables and tables where students interested in a specific pursuit can gather to exchange ideas. Every term the Houses hold faculty dinners to permit undergraduates to invite their instructors for an evening of relaxed conversation and, conversely, to provide faculty members with a means to meet their students informally and learn more about their curricular and extracurricular lives. The Houses and Yards are both located within the DSO. For students choosing to live off-campus, the Dudley Community, also within the DSO, provides academic and personal support for members of the Dudley Co-op, off-campus students, and for Visiting Undergraduate Students (VUS).

 

Harvard is engaged in an exciting large-scale effort to renew the Houses through full renovation of the buildings. House Renewal aims not only to improve conditions through renovation, but also to change how the physical spaces function to meet programmatic priorities in the residential experience. House affiliation is an important part of student identity, and each House provides students with diverse and vibrant residential communities that are cornerstones of a Harvard education.

 

Each House is overseen by resident Faculty Deans, usually a senior faculty member or senior administrator and partner or spouse, and is also served by an Allston Burr Resident Dean. The first-year students are divided into 4 Yards (Ivy, Crimson, Elm and Oak), which are overseen by 4 Resident Deans of First-Year Students. The Dudley Community also has an Allston Burr Resident Dean who supports that community.

 

All of the Resident Deans advise students in their respective units  on academic and personal matters and represents  their affiliated undergraduate members at the Administrative Board. (Instructors concerned for whatever reason about the performance or wellbeing of an undergraduate should contact the appropriate Allston Burr Resident Dean or Resident Dean of First Year Students.**) Also integral to the life of these communities  are the Resident Tutors and Proctors (proctors are specific to first-year students), who serve as social and academic advisers to the undergraduate residents of the House. They may in some cases serve as concentration advisers to the undergraduates, and they also fill a variety of administrative roles in the House. (Graduate students from the various Faculties may apply to the Faculty Deans for these positions beginning in January.)

 

Faculty members, administrators, Cambridge community members, and visiting scholars are eligible for affiliation with the individual Houses and comprise the Senior Common Room. Participation in a Senior Common Room affords individuals the opportunity not only to meet people from other departments but also to make contact with undergraduates in the casual atmosphere of the House dining rooms or at the varied House functions.

The Program in General Education
 

The Program in General Education is the cornerstone of the Harvard College curriculum. Focusing on urgent problems and enduring questions, Gen Ed courses are unusually explicit in connecting the subjects studied to the people students will become and the world beyond the classroom. Transcending disciplinary divisions, they demonstrate the value of embedding what is learned in concentrations within the broader context of the liberal arts.

The Program requires that students complete one course in each of the following four categories:

  • Aesthetics & Culture
  • Ethics & Civics
  • Histories, Societies, Individuals
  • Science & Technology in Society

One of these courses may, with the permission of the instructor, be taken Pass/Fail.

To locate General Education courses, search “General Education” at my.harvard.edu. Faculty interested in proposing a course for General Education or with questions about the program should visit gened.fas.harvard.edu/proposing-courses, or contact the General Education Office at gened@fas.harvard.edu or 617-495-2563.

The Freshman Seminar Program

Inaugurated as an experiment in 1959, and formally established by a vote of the faculty in 1963, the Freshman Seminar Program fosters intimate and engaging interaction between first-year students and faculty as they explore together topics of mutual interests. Freshman Seminars are small discussion-based courses, designed to provide a unique setting for students to deepen existing interests and discover unfamiliar fields. They are offered by faculty across the University, and ordinarily involve one faculty instructor and twelve First-Year Students meeting weekly for 2-3 hours. Many Freshman Seminars include special instructional activities—such as lab or studio work, field trips, concerts, or exhibitions—that enhance the learning experience. Freshman Seminars are not letter graded, and they count as a four-credit course. Admission to a Freshman Seminar is by application prior to the semester in which it is offered. First-Year Students are eligible to enroll in two Freshman Seminars, one in each term. For more information about the Freshman Seminar Program, please consult the website:  www.freshmanseminars.college.harvard.edu .

*Services shared by all nine faculties of the University such as food services, health services, police, fiscal services, and facilities maintenance are administered by the Office of the President.

**For further discussion of this point see the Handbook for Students which provides extensive discussion of the procedures of the Administrative Board.

my.harvard

The my.harvard Student Information System

The my.harvard Student Information System offers tools to streamline the instructing process. Faculty instructors will see a list of the courses they are currently teaching on their homepage. Five buttons are associated with each course:

  • Class Roster displays a list of all enrolled students. Instructors may send emails, view photos, and more. A badge will indicate the current number of enrolled students.
  • Course Site launches the Canvas course site.
  • Sectioning allows the instructor to set up sectioning options for the course and manage the process of assigning students to discussion sections and labs.
  • Grades provides access to the final grade roster. The instructor may use this tool manually to enter final grades or upload final grades from a spreadsheet.
  • Petitions allows instructors to view and respond to a list of student permission requests for limited enrollment courses, override enforced prerequisites, and respond to cross registration requests. A badge indicates the number of pending requests.
  • Final Assessment allows instructors to select final assessment type, used for planning seated final exams.
  • Exam Roster displays a list of all enrolled students, to be used for marking attendance during the course’s 3-hr seated exam.
  • Assessment Upload allows the instructor to upload a copy of the course's 3-hour exam, to be provided to the FAS Registrar's Office for courses with a seated exam scheduled by the Registrar.

For my.harvard how-to guides and knowledge articles, search the IT Help Portal:  https://huit.harvard.edu/ithelp

 

Academic Calendar

Fall Term 2020-21

 

The current Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Academic Calendars are located at https://registrar.fas.harvard.edu/academic-calendar.

 

Fall Term 2020-21

 

July 1, Wednesday

  • Applications for non-resident status for the fall term or academic year for graduate students due.
  • Applications for part-time graduate study due in the GSAS Dean’s Office.

July 27, Monday

  • Fall online Check-In opens for graduate students.
  • Fall online Check-In opens for undergraduate students.

Sessions between August 5 and August 20

August 10, Monday

 

  • FAS Course Registration (Crimson Cart) opens for graduate students - to allow for shopping for courses.
  • FAS Course Registration (Crimson Cart) opens for undergraduate students - to allow for shopping for courses.

August 14, Friday

 

  • Graduation applications for November 2020 degrees (AM, SM, ME, MFS, and PhD) must be submitted on or before this date.
  • Last day upon which November 2020 graduate degree candidates may submit a completed and signed application for a secondary field.

August 17, Monday

 

  • Online Check-In must be completed for College and GSAS students. Students who fail to Check-In online for Fall 2020 term will be charged a Late Check-In fee.
  • FAS Course Registration opens for graduate and undergraduate students to allow enrolling in courses

August 26, Wednesday

 

  • Course Registration Deadline. Fall term course registrations are due for all students by 11:59pm. Students must submit minimum course load - typically 16 credits - on my.harvard by 11:59pm and submitting enrollment after this time will result in a fee. After this date students must obtain permission from all instructors to enroll in courses.

August 24, Monday and August 25, Tuesday

  • New Faculty Institute

September 2, Wednesday

  • Academic year begins; first day of classes.

September 7, Monday

  • University Holiday: Labor Day

September 8, Tuesday

  • Approved graduate dissertations due for November 2020 degree candidates who wish to have fall tuition and Student Health Insurance Plan removed from their student account.

September 9, Wednesday

 

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may Check-In/register late for the fall term.
  • Last day on which GSAS students may withdraw from their program and cancel registration for the fall term without payment of tuition.
  • Approved graduate dissertations due for November 2020 degree candidates who wish to retain health coverage for the fall 2020 term (through January 31, 2021) and who would like to be charged accordingly should submit the dissertation on September 9, 2020.

September 14, Monday

  • Make-up examinations for spring 2020 begin.

September 21, Monday (3rd Monday)

  • Last day upon which undergraduates and GSAS students may drop or add any course without a fee.

October 5, Monday (5th Monday)

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any course or change the grade status of a letter-graded or Pass/Fail course.
  • Last day students from other schools may file cross-registration petitions for fall term with the FAS Registrar's Office. Note some schools have earlier deadlines.

October 6, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3pm.

October 12, Monday

  • University holiday: Columbus Day (Federal) / Indigenous Peoples' Day (City of Cambridge)

October 19, Monday (7th Monday)

  • Last day upon which graduate students may add (or enroll in) fall term courses. To add a course after this date an approved Petition to Add must be submitted to the GSAS Office of Student Affairs.
  • Last day upon which graduate students may add or change SAT/UNS grading option for designated language courses.

TBD

November 2, Monday (9th Monday)

  • Last day upon which graduate students may drop a fall course. To withdraw from a fall course after this date an approved Petition to Withdraw must be submitted to the GSAS Office of Student Affairs and a notation of WD will be recorded if Petition is approved.

November 3, Tuesday

 

  • Tentative - Spring Online Check-In opens for graduate students.
  • FAS Spring Course Registration (Crimson Cart) opens for graduate students - to allow for shopping for courses.

November 3, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3 pm.

November 10, Tuesday

  • Conferral date for November 2020 degrees.

November 11, Wednesday

  • University (Administrative) Holiday: Veterans' Day. FAS classes will be held as scheduled.

November 16, Monday (11th Monday)

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may petition to withdraw from a fall term course.

November 19, Thursday

  • Declarations of Concentration due for undergraduate on-cycle first-semester sophomores.

November 25, Wednesday through November 29, Sunday

  • Thanksgiving Recess.

December 1, Tuesday

  • Undergraduate applications for March 2021 degrees (AB and SB) must be submitted on or before this date.
  • Last day to change concentration for March 2021 degree candidates without Administrative Board approval.
  • Last day upon which March 2021 degree candidates (AB and SB) may file for a foreign language citation study plan or petition for a secondary field.
  • Graduate applications for March 2021 degrees (AM, SM, ME, MFS, and PhD) must be submitted on or before this date.
  • Graduate applications for Secondary Field due for March 2021 degree candidates.
  • Graduate student applications for non-resident status for the spring term due.
  • Graduate student applications for part-time study due.

December 1, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3 pm.

December 3, Thursday

  • Last day of fall term classes.

December 4, Friday, through December 9, Wednesday

  • Reading Period.

December 9, Wednesday

  • Last day in the fall term upon which graduate students may petition for late withdrawal from a course.

December 10, Thursday, through December 19, Saturday

 

December 20, 2020, Sunday through January 24, 2021, Sunday

 

  • Winter Recess.

January 11, Monday through January 22, Friday

 

January 18, Monday

 

  • University holiday: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. No classes held.

January 19, Tuesday

 

  • Deadline for March 2021 graduate degree candidates to submit approved dissertations to the FAS Registrar's Office.

January 24, Sunday

  • Last day upon which graduate students may submit work for incomplete grades from the spring 2020 term.

 

Spring Term 2020-21

The current Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Academic Calendars are located at https://registrar.fas.harvard.edu/academic-calendar.

Spring Term 2020-21

January 11, Monday

  • Spring term Online Check-In opens for undergraduate students.

January 19, Tuesday

  • Approved graduated dissertations due for March 2021 degree candidates.

TBD

January 24, Sunday

  • Deadline for graduate students to submit work for Incomplete grades from the spring 2020 term.

January 25, Monday

  • Spring term begins.
  • Online Check-In must be completed for all GSAS students, including Special Students and Visiting Fellows.
  • Online Check-In must be completed for all Harvard College students, including visiting undergraduates.

TBD

  • Course Registration Deadline - Fall term course registrations are due for all students by 11:59pm. Students must submit minimum course load - typically 16 credits - on my.harvard by 11:59pm and submitting enrollment after this time will result in a fee. After this date students must obtain permission from all instructors to enroll in courses.

January 29, Friday

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may check-in/register late for the spring term.
  • Last day upon which graduate students may cancel their registration for the spring term without payment of tuition.
  • Graduate dissertation deadline for May 2021 degree candidates who wish to have spring tuition and Student Health Fee and Student Health Insurance Plan removed from their student account. Students who submit dissertation on or before this date will have health coverage canceled as of January 31, 2021.

February 2, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3 pm.

February 5, Friday

  • Wellness Day (no classes held)

February 8, Monday (3rd Monday)

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add any course without a fee.
  • Makeup examinations for fall 2020 term begin.
  • Last day upon which GSAS students may drop a spring course without paying a fee.

February 15, Monday

  • University holiday: Presidents’ Day. No classes held.

TBD

February 22, Monday (Fifth Monday)

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may drop or add a spring course or change the grade status of a letter-graded or Pass/Fail course.
  • Last day students from other schools may file cross-registration petitions for spring term with the FAS Registrar's Office. Note some schools have earlier deadlines.

March 1, Monday

  • Wellness Day (No classes held)

March 2, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3 pm.
  • Conferral date for March 2021 degrees.

March 8, Monday (7th Monday)

  • Last day upon which graduate students may add (or enroll in) spring term courses. To add a course after this date an approved Petition to Add must be submitted.
  • Last day upon which graduate students may add or change SAT/UNS grading option for designated language courses.

March 16, Tuesday

  • Wellness Day (No classes held)

March 22, Monday (9th Monday)

  • Last day upon which graduate students may drop a spring course. To withdraw from a fall course after this date an approved Petition to Withdraw must be submitted and a notation of WD will be recorded.

March 31, Wednesday

  • Wellness Day (No classes held)

April 1, Thursday

  • Undergraduate (AB and SM) and graduate (AM, SM, ME, MFS, and PhD) student applications for May 2021 degrees must be submitted on or before this date.
  • Last day to change concentration for May 2021 and November 2021 degree candidates without Administrative Board approval.
  • Last day upon which May and November 2021 degree candidates (AB and SB) may file a foreign language citation study plan or petition for a secondary field.
  • Graduate student application for Secondary field due for May 2021 degree candidates.

April 5, Monday (11th Monday)

  • Last day upon which undergraduates may petition to withdraw from a spring term course.

April 6, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3 pm.

April 8, Thursday

  • Declaration of Concentration due for off-cycle students expected to declare in spring.

April 15, Thursday

  • Wellness Day (No classes held)

April 28, Wednesday

  • Last day of spring term classes.

April 29, Thursday, through May 5, Wednesday

  • Reading Period.

May 4, Tuesday

  • Faculty meeting at 3 pm.

May 5, Wednesday

  • Last day in the spring term upon which graduate students may submit approved Petition to Withdraw from a spring course and a notation of WD will be recorded.

May 6, Thursday, through May 15, Saturday

 

May 13, Thursday

  • Approved graduate dissertations due for May 2021 degree candidates.

May 24, Monday

  • Degree Meeting; Faculty vote May 2021 degrees at 4:30 pm.

May 27, Thursday

  • Harvard University Commencement.

May 31, Monday

  • University holiday: Memorial Day.

 

 

Tentative Calendar for 2021-2022

 

                                    Fall Term 2021-2022

Academic year begins

Wed Sept 1 

Course registration deadline

Thu Sept 9† 

Thanksgiving recess

Wed Nov 24–Sun Nov 28

Reading period

Fri Dec 3 –Wed Dec 8 

Examination period

Thu Dec 9–Sat Dec 18

Spring Term 2021-2022

Spring term begins

Mon Jan 24

Course registration deadline

Fri Jan 28†

Spring recess

Sat Mar 12–Sun Mar 20

Reading period

Thu Apr 28–Wed May 4 

Examination period

Thu May 5–Sat May 14 

Commencement

Thu May 26

Note: The Harvard University Coordinated Academic Calendar became effective with the 2009-2010 academic year. Special attention should be paid to deadlines as many will vary from prior years.

† Course Registration deadline for all students.

 

Responsibilities of Instructors

Instructors' Presence

Instructors' Presence During the Academic Year

Instructors are expected to be "in residence" (i.e., during the COVID-19 pandemic, this means present virtually and, to the extent possible, in the vicinity of Harvard, consistent with strict adherence to Harvard and other guidelines) and available to colleagues and students during term time (including the Reading Periods and Examination Periods). However, short absences for unforeseen personal business or professional development during term time are possible. Faculty are expected to fulfill their assigned teaching obligations and should only use substitute instructors (including teaching fellows) in exceptional cases.

Faculty members wishing to be absent during term time (including Reading Periods and Examination Periods) for a period of more than one week, or for a period of one week or less where the absence will require some reduction or change in scheduled instruction, should first consult with the chair of their department. When requesting such leaves, it is incumbent on faculty members to consider their academic responsibilities and to ensure that they continue to be met. Before authorizing the absence, the chair should be satisfied that the reason for absence, whether personal or professional, is sufficiently compelling and that all teaching and other departmental responsibilities are appropriately covered. If the absence is for one week or less, no further approval is required. If a period longer than one week is necessary, the faculty member submits to the assistant dean for the division a “Request for Permission to be Absent” form, signed by the chair (found on the "Leaves" page of the website for FAS faculty and researchers). To request a leave for public service, faculty should follow the procedure outlined in Chapter 3 of the FAS Appointment and Promotion Handbook.

Note: If the faculty member is teaching only in non-departmental programs for the term, the faculty member has the “Request for Permission to be Absent” form signed by the director of the relevant program before submission to the assistant dean for the division.

For more information on leave policies for faculty, please see Chapter 3 of the FAS Appointment and Promotion Handbook.

 

Instruction

Responsibility for Instruction

Responsibility for instruction rests solely with the head of the course. This person’s name appears with the course listing in my.harvard as the instructor of the course.

FAS appointments at the rank of Convertible Instructor, Lecturer, Dependent Lecturer, Preceptor, College Fellow, Benjamin Peirce Fellow, Briggs-Copeland Lecturer, Associate Senior Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Senior Preceptor, full-time or part-time Professor of the Practice, Professor in Residence, Visiting Lecturer, Visiting Professor (assistant professor, associate professor, or professor), or Professor (assistant, associate, or tenured) are teaching appointments. Teaching Fellowships, Teaching Assistantships, and Course Assistantships are not teaching appointments in this context; persons holding these ranks assist in courses or tutorials under the supervision of those holding teaching appointments. Recommendations for teaching appointments may be made only by departments or committees empowered to offer courses for credit.

Faculty in the teaching appointment ranks listed above can serve as course heads; however, preceptors do not ordinarily serve as course heads.

Regarding members of other Harvard Faculties, only Senior Lecturers, Professors of the Practice, Professors in Residence, assistant professors, associate professors, or tenured professors in another Harvard Faculty may teach in the FAS without an FAS teaching appointment. All other non-FAS faculty may teach in the FAS only if they are appointed to the rank of Lecturer in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences under the normal rules governing such appointments.

The term “responsibility for instruction” includes:

  • Responsibility for the structure and content of the course, including any regular sections of the course;
  • Responsibility for the continuity of course meetings, whether these be lecture or discussion groups;
  • Responsibility for the evaluation of student performance in the course, including the performance of students who may have been granted makeup examinations that take place the following term; and
  • Responsibility for the selection and training of teaching fellows, teaching assistants, and course assistants in accordance with policies established by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and/or the department.

None of the above responsibilities may be delegated to persons not holding teaching appointments.

Instructors who hold a teaching appointment or who assist in courses or tutorials may not give private instruction for pay to students in the University without the consent of the Chair of the department concerned and the Dean of the Faculty. Under no circumstances may instructors privately tutor for pay in courses in which they are employed by the University.

 

Evaluation

Responsibility for Evaluation

Responsibility for evaluation rests with the individual listed in my.harvard as the instructor in charge (the course head). For Independent Study, responsibility rests with that individual holding a teaching appointment who has signed the petition permitting the student to enroll. (See Special Types of Courses: Independent Study.)

In some large courses or tutorials, teaching fellows, teaching assistants, or course assistants may have a role in the evaluation of the students in the course, subject to the limitations set by the Faculty Council and the Standing Committee on Undergraduate Educational Policy (the “EPC”) (see below). Nevertheless, the course head is responsible for ensuring that the standards for evaluating student work are equitable across all sections of a course, and the final responsibility for each grade rests with the course head. This includes the evaluation of makeup examinations that are administered during the following term.

The work of graduate students, including those enrolled in courses open to both graduate and undergraduate students (100-level and below), should be evaluated only by individuals holding teaching appointments as defined in the above section. "Work" refers to major examinations and written exercises but not necessarily to problem sets, laboratory work, or similar exercises. In the same light, while undergraduate course assistants may participate in the evaluation of students, they should not be involved in the subjective evaluation of essays and examinations.

Conduct

Professional Conduct

FAS Professional Conduct Policy

“FAS Faculty members (‘Faculty’ or ‘Faculty Members’) hold positions of authority and trust at FAS. As such, they have an obligation to uphold the highest standards of professionalism and integrity in their interactions with all members of the FAS community, including faculty colleagues, students, persons holding research appointments (e.g., postdoctoral fellows), and staff members. In keeping with this role:

a.  Faculty should treat members of the FAS community with respect and collegiality.
b.  Faculty members should not use their positions to obtain uncompensated labor from any member of the community under their supervision. This includes, but is not limited to, requiring staff under their direction to perform services or duties unrelated to or outside their professional/job responsibilities.
c.  Faculty members must uphold confidentiality in matters pertaining to employee files, records, or activities, which could reasonably be considered confidential. This could include employment information or employee records.
d.  Faculty must comply with all applicable laws, rules, regulations and professional standards including FAS policies and practices; this includes, but is not limited to, policies regarding discrimination and sexual and gender-based harassment.

Non-compliance with these guidelines will be communicated to the Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and could result in varying sanctions.”

Student Union Agreement

As noted in Harvard University’s agreement with the Harvard Graduate Students Union:

"Abusive or intimidating behavior (power-based harassment) by individuals who hold supervisory authority over SWs, when such conduct interferes with or limits a person’s ability to participate in, or benefit from their employment at the University is prohibited."

Faculty Council Discussion Document

The following text was approved by the Faculty Council for distribution to the full Faculty, not as a codification of official institutional policy but as a "discussion document" to be used as a point of reference. An earlier version of this text was discussed at the Faculty Meeting of October 17, 1995.

The secret of education lies in respecting the pupil. −Emerson

The importance of professional conduct within the academic community is self-evident, but what precisely is meant by the phrase is not. For "professional conduct" covers a multitude of situations. No single style or method of teaching guarantees it; a teacher may be appropriately professional whether meeting students at a café or in an office, whether by nature gregarious and sociable, or shy and reserved. Yet there are principles underlying the concept, that allow it to be honored when present and deplored when absent. In a university setting, professional conduct rests upon an enduring respect for fellow human beings and for the vocation of teaching, and a recognition that a teacher’s powers and responsibilities must not be abused. The basic principles may be easier to appreciate abstractly than to apply while teaching.

The list that follows is designed to bring these principles into focus as a basis for discussion among and between faculty, teaching fellows, and other instructional support staff.

Issues for Consideration

Authority

By virtue of their authority within the academic community, teachers have the power to influence thought and behavior, and the concomitant responsibility to recognize the potential weight of their verbal and nonverbal expressions. As leaders in the classroom, teachers have the responsibility not only to impart the excitement of ideas and the challenge of academic debate, but also the importance of courtesy and respect in intellectual dialogue.

Fair Treatment of All Students

Students should be treated even handedly. Equity is not necessarily achieved, however, by treating all students in precisely the same way. For example, some students respond positively to hearty, well-intoned criticism while others are discouraged by it. Some students welcome public comments about their work, while others are embarrassed by them. Genuinely even-handed treatment of students depends upon making a conscientious attempt to recognize and appreciate such differences. Teachers (and students) should guard particularly against ethnic, religious, sexual, and other discriminatory stereotyping.

Interpersonal Relations

The power teachers exercise over students to penalize or reward in the form of grades and recommendations requires caution in interpersonal interactions, and the need to avoid the kind of familiarity that compromises objective and fair evaluation of a student’s work….Within these limits, however, intellectual mentoring and friendly interaction are important elements of the learning and teaching process.

Interpersonal Relations – Sexual Harassment and Misconduct Policy*

As noted in the Interim FAS Policies and Procedures Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Sexual Misconduct, “No FAS Faculty member shall request or accept sexual favors from, or initiate or engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with, any undergraduate student at Harvard College. Faculty members are defined as ladder, non-ladder, and visiting faculty. Furthermore, no FAS Faculty member, instructor, teaching assistant, teaching fellow, researcher, tutor, graduate student, or undergraduate course assistant, shall request or accept sexual favors from, or initiate or engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with, any student, including a graduate student or DCE student, who is enrolled in a course taught by that individual or otherwise subject to that individual’s academic supervision before the supervision has concluded and, if applicable, a final grade on the student’s supervised academic performance has been submitted to the Registrar. Academic supervision includes teaching, advising a thesis or dissertation, supervising research, supervising teaching, grading, or serving as Director of Undergraduate or Graduate Studies of the student’s academic program. In addition, no resident tutor or freshman proctor shall request or accept sexual favors from, or initiate or engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with, any undergraduate student at Harvard College.”

* This section regarding interpersonal relations and Title IX, while not part of the original document approved by Faculty Council, is provided here to reflect the FAS’s current policies on sexual and gender-based harassment and other sexual misconduct.

Clear Communication
 

Because the evaluation of students partly depends on their understanding of the requirements of a course, course heads should be clear in their articulation of expectations, assignments, and the rules of collaboration and citation. Providing written explanations of assignments and requirements reduces the risk of misunderstanding. Students have a right to expect prompt return of papers and exams and a clear justification of evaluation, just as instructors have the right to expect that assignments will be thoughtfully completed on time.

Classroom Engagement

The classroom is frequently the site of intense intellectual debate—or, alternatively, unbearable silence. Maintaining an environment for a constructive contest between ideas and their supporting evidence is primarily the responsibility of the teacher. Teachers should be aware of any tendency to favor one mode of argument over another, in which only certain students thrive; of the importance of listening attentively and with respect; and of the significance of nonverbal clues (nods, frowns, gestures, etc.).

Services

Criticism of Work

Comments should be directed at the work, not the person; and they should contribute to the refinement of both thinking and presentation. Peremptory dismissiveness is not appropriate.

Grades

Professors are responsible for the oversight of all grades given by teaching fellows.

Letters of Recommendation

Students depend on instructors for letters of recommendation. Honesty and fairness in responding to requests for recommendations are essential.

Advising

Access to advising should be offered and equally afforded to all.

Confidentiality and Discretion

Teachers are privy to information (and opinions) about students that ought to remain confidential. Exceptions should be made only as necessary, e.g., in Title IX situations or emergencies such as threat of suicide or other harmful behavior, when confidentiality is secondary to a student’s welfare. Beyond such exceptions, talking with colleagues or other students about confidential student information is inappropriate, as is any form of public embarrassment or shaming of a student.

Confidentiality regarding Sexual Harassment and Misconduct Policy *

As noted in the Interim FAS Policies and Procedures Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Sexual Misconduct, “Consistent with University policies, the FAS officers, other than those who are prohibited from making such notifications because of a legal confidentiality obligation, must promptly notify the relevant Title IX Resource Coordinator(s) about possible sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct. This means that if those FAS officers learn about a possible incident of sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct, they need to contact an FAS Title IX Resource Coordinator, who will know what steps, if any, to take next (including which other Title IX Resource Coordinators should be notified). Such FAS officers include (but are not limited to): deans; administrative and professional staff; those responsible for residential life (for example, Faculty Deans, Resident Deans, Resident and Non-Resident Tutors, Resident Advisors and Proctors); coaches and assistant coaches; other personnel who work directly with students, such as those who work with student clubs and organizations, career services, academic support, and others; and faculty, instructors, teaching assistants, and others who teach students, including graduate student teaching fellows.”

For more information, please see section IV, “Information Sharing and Confidentiality,” in the Interim FAS Policies and Procedures Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Sexual Misconduct.
 

* This section on confidentiality regarding Title IX, while not part of the original document approved by Faculty Council, is provided here to reflect the FAS’s current policies on sexual and gender-based harassment and other sexual misconduct.
 

Collegial Conduct

Status differences exist within the teaching staff of every university. Awareness of the relative positions of colleagues in the academic hierarchy may avoid placing them in awkward or compromising situations. The implications of making particular requests of one’s juniors ought to be considered before making them; the right to refuse, for reasonable cause, without consequence, ought to be guaranteed every member of the community. Professional and research opportunities should be awarded with equity and fairness.

In addition to the Faculty Council’s text above, please note:

Interactions with Minors

Members of the Harvard community who interact with minors (i.e., individuals under the age of 18) in any official capacity are expected to foster and maintain an appropriate and secure environment for minors. Please see Harvard University’s "Policy for the Safety and Protection of Minors" for more information.

Other Sources of Information

Please see Sexual Harassment in this chapter for more information on FAS policies and procedures related to sexual harassment and other misconduct.

 

Student Privacy

The University has a legal obligation to protect the privacy of students and the confidentiality of student records. No information about a student’s academic performance can be released without the student’s written permission. It is equally important to respect students’ privacy when distributing their grades. Instructors should not leave papers, projects, or examinations in unattended public areas. Similarly, grades should never be posted with the students’ names, and/or Harvard University Identification (HUID) numbers. Such practices are a violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). Questions about the confidentiality of student records and about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be directed to the Registrar, Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center, 1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 450, Cambridge, Massachusetts (617-495-1543). (See Posting of Grades.)

Use of Computing and Network Services

Use of Computing and Network Services 

Faculty members are provided access to University computer systems for academic use. All authorized users assume responsibility for acting to preserve the integrity of these systems and any University data to which they may have access. Information about academic computing and network services offered by Harvard University Information Technology (HUIT) is available at huit.harvard.edu/ithelp or by calling 617-495-7777.

Privacy of Information

The unauthorized examination of information stored on a computer system or sent electronically over a network is a breach of academic and community standards. Authorized system support staff, however, may gain access to users’ data or programs when it is necessary to maintain or prevent harm to the University, its computer systems or the network.

On shared and networked computer systems certain information about users and their activities is visible to others. Users are cautioned that certain accounting and directory information (for example, user names and email addresses), certain records of file names and executed commands, and information stored in public areas, are not private.

Faculty members have the legal obligation to maintain the privacy of files containing confidential information, including student information such as course grades and letters of recommendation. Helpful information about using confidential information securely may be found at www.security.harvard.edu.

On shared and networked computer systems certain information about users and their activities is visible to others on those systems. Examples of observable information include, but are not limited to, certain accounting and directory information (for example, usernames and email addresses), certain records of file names and executed commands, and information stored in shared or public folders.

For consultation on securing electronic information, please contact HUIT at 617-495-7777.

Harvard University Policy on Access to Electronic Information

Harvard has established a Policy on Access to Electronic Information that sets out guidelines and processes for University access to user electronic information stored in or transmitted through any University system. This policy applies to all Schools and units of the University. 

Accessible Education

Students Requiring Accessible Education

Accessible Education Office

Smith Campus Center, Fourth Floor
617-496-8707
Fax: 617-496-1098 
Email: aeo.fas.harvard.edu

Harvard University is committed to providing students who have disabilities with equal access to all affiliated programs and activities through inclusive design and the provision of reasonable accommodations.

The Accessible Education Office (AEO), which serves College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) as well as the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) students, collaborates with faculty and students to make this possible.

Disability information, including diagnoses and clinical documentation, is protected under FERPA, and it is important that all communication with students regarding accommodations be individualized and only shared with other university officials on a need-to-know basis. 

Ongoing communication and collaboration on the part of faculty, teaching staff, AEO, administrators, and students themselves is essential. Students should initiate accommodation requests through the AIM portal, which is accessed through a link on the AEO website. Once students are determined eligible for accommodations, they will be guided each semester to select which approved accommodations they need for each class. This will then be communicated through an introductory letter sent by AEO giving an overview of their approved accommodations. Students making such requests without this letter should be referred directly to AEO. Providing accommodations in the course to students who are not registered with AEO can result in inconsistent implementation of university procedures. Members of the Faculty best understand the essential components of their courses, and accommodations are not designed to alter or eliminate any essential requirements of a course.

The course head is responsible for implementing all AEO-approved academic accommodations needed for classroom instruction, including midterm or hourly examinations. AEO will send a Testing Agreement Form attached to the accommodations letter to request information about midterm/hourly examinations for students with alternative testing accommodations.  Faculty will have the option to request that AEO proctor midterm tests, given all information is completed in advance on the Testing Agreement Form. Should the form not be completed and returned in a timely manner, or if faculty choose to administer course assessments themselves, they will be responsible for implementing all required testing accommodations, including finding a separate room for exam administration. If a student requires a scribe or similar service to write for a midterm or hourly exam, the course head should reach out to AEO for assistance. Accommodated exams are expected to occur on the same day as in-class exams. All final examinations for students with AEO-approved exam accommodations are administered during the final exam period by the Exams Office and appropriate accommodations will be made in conjunction with AEO (see entry below.)

Course heads should routinely note in the course syllabus and announce at the first class meeting that students approved for accommodations should contact the teaching staff to discuss elements of the course that may be inaccessible and develop a plan together on how their accommodations will be implemented, based on their letter from AEO.

 

Faculty who utilize universal design in learning for all students know that effective strategies for instruction frequently obviate the need for accommodations. Some suggestions are:

 

  • Provide course materials in accessible formats, including documents/PDFs that are screen-readable. The Assistive Technology Center (ATC) is available to help with preparation of accessible materials as long as they are provided to them in advance. Increased reliance on and availability of digital text benefits all students. Other formats may include Braille or enlarged print, which the ATC can provide.
  • Ensure students who are Deaf or hard of hearing have available seating space in the front of the room and that the room has appropriate lighting. If movies or slide presentations occur, an alternative lighting source will be required for students who need to see interpreters. Some students may use FM listening devices associated with their hearing aids that require teaching staff to use a wireless (non-amplifying) microphone. If microphones are available in the classroom, they should be used at all times. Faculty should make advance arrangements to provide open-captioned films and audio material and can receive assistance with captioning by contacting the AEO.
  • Call for volunteers from the class as soon as the need for a note-taker has been communicated, taking care not to disclose the student’s name or disability. Typically, note-takers who take their notes in an electronic format are preferred as they are able to email the AEO student their notes immediately after the class.
  • Ensure that lectures, sections, review sessions, etc. are held in physically accessible spaces when required. The Registrar's Office classroom section (617-495-1541) can assist when relocation of a course is necessary.

When students make course changes after the registration deadline and before the fifth Monday of the term, it is understood that delays in the preparation of reformatted materials may result, affecting both students and instructional staff.

Assistive Technology Center

Harvard University Science Center B06
617-496-8800
atc@fas.harvard.edu 
atc.fas.harvard.edu

The Assistive Technology Center (ATC) serves all students registered with AEO and Local Disability Coordinators throughout the University and who depend on print alternatives to access course materials. The ATC provides support through technology, which can include electronic version of course materials, and access to course content in the classroom.

Faculty members who require assistance producing handouts, lecture notes, exams, or other course materials converted into digital text, Braille, or enlarged text, can contact the ATC for assistance. If a student requires the use of a laptop as an exam accommodation, a course staff member may email the ATC  to arrange for an equipment loan. Arrangements for reformatted material or the loan of equipment should be made least 5 business days in advance.

Final Examinations for Students with AEO-Approved Exam Accommodations

 

All seated final examinations for students with AEO-approved exam accommodations are administered during the Examination Period by the FAS Registrar's Office, and appropriate accommodations will be made in conjunction with AEO. For questions concerning the administration of final exams (e.g., the date, time, or location of exams) contact the FAS Registrar's Office, exams@fas.harvard.edu or 617-495-1542. For questions concerning accommodations, contact the AEO, aeo@fas.harvard.edu or 617-496-8707.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment and Other Sexual Misconduct

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is committed to fostering an open and supportive community that promotes learning, teaching, research, and discovery. This commitment includes maintaining a safe and healthy educational and work environment in which no member of the community is, on the basis of sex, including sexual orientation or gender identity, excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination in any University program or activity. Sexual harassment, including sexual violence, is a form of sex discrimination in that it denies an individual equal access to the University’s programs or activities.

The Harvard University Interim Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy was developed in response to the changes issued by the U.S. Department of Education in May 2020, and conduct that falls outside of the jurisdiction of that policy is addressed in the Harvard University Interim Other Sexual Misconduct Policy.

According to the University Interim Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy, sexual harassment is defined in the following way: Sexual harassment is unwelcome conduct on the basis of sex, including sexual orientation and gender identity. Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances; requests for sexual favors; and other verbal, nonverbal, graphic, or physical conduct of a sexual nature or based on sexual orientation or gender identity, that satisfies one or more of the following: (1) an employee of the University either explicitly or implicitly conditioning the provision of an aid, benefit, or services of the University, such as an individual’s employment or academic standing (for example, academic evaluation, grades, or advancement) on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct (quid pro quo); quid pro quo sexual harassment can occur whether a person resists and suffers the threatened harm, or the person submits and avoids the threatened harm. Both situations could constitute discrimination on the basis of sex; or (2) unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the University’s education or work programs or activities; or (3) sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

The University Interim Other Sexual Misconduct Policy defines “other sexual misconduct” in the following way: "Other sexual misconduct is unwelcome conduct on the basis of sex, including sexual orientation and gender identity. Other sexual misconduct includes unwelcome sexual advances; requests for sexual favors; and other verbal, nonverbal, graphic, or physical conduct of a sexual nature or based on sexual orientation or gender identity, that satisfies one or more of the following: (1) an employee of the University either explicitly or implicitly conditioning the provision of an aid, benefit, or services of the University, such as an individual’s employment or academic standing (for example, academic evaluation, grades, or advancement) on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct (quid pro quo), which may occur whether a person resists and suffers the threatened harm or the person submits and avoids the threatened harm; or (2) unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it effectively denies a person access to the University’s education or work programs or activities (hostile environment).

While the FAS adheres to the University policies, the Interim FAS Policies and Procedures Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Sexual Misconduct elaborates on and supplements the University policies.

The FAS Interim Policies prohibit sexual relations with students in the following way: “No FAS Faculty member shall request or accept sexual favors from, or initiate or engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with, any undergraduate student at Harvard College. Faculty members are defined as ladder, non-ladder, and visiting faculty. Furthermore, no FAS Faculty member, instructor, teaching assistant, teaching fellow, researcher, tutor, proctor, graduate student, or undergraduate course assistant, shall request or accept sexual favors from, or initiate or engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with, any student, including a graduate student or DCE student, who is enrolled in a course taught by that individual or otherwise subject to that individual’s academic supervision before the supervision has concluded and, if applicable, a final grade on the student’s supervised academic performance has been submitted to the Registrar. Academic supervision includes teaching, advising a thesis or dissertation, supervising research, supervising teaching, grading, or serving as Director of Undergraduate or Graduate Studies of the student’s academic program. In addition, no resident tutor or freshman proctor shall request or accept sexual favors from, or initiate or engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with, any undergraduate student at Harvard College.

The FAS Interim Policies contain the following provision regarding information sharing and confidentiality: “Consistent with University policies, the FAS officers, other than those who are prohibited from making such notifications because of a legal confidentiality obligation, must promptly notify the relevant Title IX Resource Coordinator(s) about possible sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct. This means that if those FAS officers learn about a possible incident of sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct, they need to contact an FAS Title IX Resource Coordinator, who will know what steps, if any, to take next (including which other Title IX Resource Coordinators should be notified). Such FAS officers include (but are not limited to): deans; administrative and professional staff; those responsible for residential life (for example, Faculty Deans, Resident Deans, Resident and Non-Resident Tutors, Resident Advisors, and Proctors); coaches and assistant coaches; other personnel who work directly with students, such as those who work with student clubs and organizations, career services, academic support, and others; and faculty, instructors, teaching assistants, and others who teach students, including graduate student teaching fellows.

 

The Commission of Inquiry

The Commission of Inquiry serves as a clearing house for inquiries or complaints brought to it by members of the Faculty or of the student bodies of Harvard College or the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. It consists of three faculty members and two students. Complaints or inquiries should be addressed to the Commission of Inquiry c/o the Secretary of the Faculty at secfas@fas.harvard.edu. The Commission will then direct the complaint or query to the appropriate agency of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. If such an agency does not exist, the Commission will attempt to aid in resolving the matter. The Commission is sometimes instrumental in establishing a new agency for handling recurrent issues. Although the Commission has no power to make rulings, it can play an advocacy role in pressing for the resolution of issues.

 

 

Human Subjects Research

 

Harvard University policy and federal regulations require that all research involving human subjects that meets the federal regulatory definition of human subjects research be reviewed and approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) before the research begins. This requirement applies to all human subjects research meeting the federal definition conducted by faculty, staff and students, on and off campus, regardless of funding. The IRB for Harvard University Area researchers is the Committee on the Use of Human Subjects (CUHS).

The purpose of the IRB is to weigh risks and benefits of participation in research and to protect the rights and welfare of the research participants. The guiding ethical principles of the IRB,­ respect for persons, beneficence, and justice ­ are embodied in the "Belmont Report: Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research."

Applications to the IRB must be submitted through the Electronic Submission, Tracking and Reporting system (ESTR). Please consult the CUHS website or contact CUHS at (617) 496-2847 or cuhs@harvard.edu to find out more information about:

  • The types of research that require IRB review;
  • The process for submitting applications;
  • The training required for investigators and their Faculty Sponsors;
  • Appropriate forms, templates, and guidance documents;
  • And, the special process and training program for undergraduate research (http://cuhs.harvard.edu/urtp-portal)

Committee on the Use of Human Subjects

Harvard University
44-R Brattle Street, Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
Cambridge, MA 02138
email: cuhs@harvard.edu
Phone: (617) 496-2847

CUHS Staff Contact Information

 

 

 

Research and Teaching Involving Animal Subjects

Research Administrative Services
IACUC Website; HarvardKey access with permission
Office of the Vice Provost for Research

The use of live animals in research and teaching is a societal and individual privilege that is taken seriously at Harvard and is a highly regulated activity. University policies and government regulations require advance review and approval of all vertebrate animal and cephalopod research prior to its commencement. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ federally mandated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for reviewing and approving proposed studies.

All individuals planning to use vertebrate animals or cephalopods in research and/or teaching must establish, or be listed on, an IACUC-approved protocol, participate in the institution’s occupational health program, be appropriately trained to perform procedures, attend facility orientation as required, and complete assigned Harvard Training Portal modules that acquaint the participants with Harvard policies as well as federal, state, and City of Cambridge regulations regarding the use of animals. These processes may be started or verified by contacting IACUC Administration at IACUC@fas.harvard.edu.

The Office of Animal Resources (OAR) is the unit responsible for the housing, daily care and health of vertebrate animals used on campus in the FAS. All mammals and other select vertebrates housed in OAR-managed facilities must be ordered through the OAR’s Animal Ordering system; questions regarding animal orders may be sent to animalorders@fas.harvard.edu.

Any concerns or questions about the care and use of laboratory animals should be directed promptly to any of the following contacts listed below. In accordance with the University’s Whistleblower Policy, the University will protect from retaliation members of the Harvard community who make good faith reports of suspected violations of law or University policy. The University’s Compliance Hotline is a resource for members of the Harvard community who are uncomfortable reporting through the recommended contacts and prefer to anonymously report any suspected violations of law or Harvard policy. 

  • Craig P. Hunter,  PhD, IACUC Chair, HU/FAS Standing Committee on the Use of Animals in Research and Teaching: (617) 495-8309 or cphunter@fas.harvard.edu
  • Leslie A. Kirwan, Dean for Administration and Finance of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Institutional Official of the Animal Care and Use program: (617) 496-8729, leslie_kirwan@harvard.edu
  • Kathleen R. Pritchett-Corning, DVM, Attending Veterinarian and Director of the Office of Animal Resources: (617) 384-6642, pritchettcorning@fas.harvard.edu
  • Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee administrative office: iacuc@fas.harvard.edu
  • Compliance Hotline: 877-694-2275 FREE

 

 

Course Administration

Course Catalog

The Course Catalog 
 
Through the my.harvard Course Search the Faculty of Arts and Sciences offers undergraduate and graduate courses to students registered in Harvard College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science, and to other Harvard University graduate students in good standing.

During the summer of 2015, the my.harvard Course Search replaced Courses of Instruction as the online course catalog for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. The Course Search is updated every 24 hours and is accessible at my.harvard Course Search.
 
The Office of the Registrar compiles courses by gathering information from department, division, and committee offices (not individual instructors) as well as the Dean’s office. Department and committee chairs should approve all new courses and course changes. Curriculum Coordinators throughout FAS collaborate with the Registrar's Office to create and maintain curricular offerings. 
 
Course information published through the my.harvard Course Search becomes the official basis for the Registrar’s records; it affects classroom assignments, examination schedules, and the release of electronic course lists and grade sheets. Moreover, complete and up-to-date course information enables the Registrar to carry out Faculty policy regarding simultaneous course enrollment, as well as to locate individual students in an emergency. For this reason it is extremely important that departments and committees relay course information changes to curriculum coordinators—especially changes of instructor or meeting time—regardless of when they occur in the academic year. Curriculum Coordinators may contact Academic Planning (courses@fas.harvard.edu) in the Office of the Registrar for assistance with entering changes.

Creating or Modifying a Course

Points to Consider When Creating or Modifying a Course in the my.harvard Course Search 

When creating or modifying a course, faculty members are advised to consult with the appropriate curricular committee(s). Curricular committees may create or modify course "subjects" (the high-level subject category in the online catalog). The points listed below are based on the policies of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. The Academic Planning group in the Office of the Registrar will work with faculty members to set and display a course (or set of courses) in a manner that best reflects the pedagogy of the course within the bounds of current technical resources. 

Courses are numbered according to the following scheme: 

1-99 or 910-999: Primarily for Undergraduates 
100-199 or 1000-1999: For Undergraduates and Graduates 
200-299 or 2000-2999: Primarily for Graduates 
300-399 or 3000-3999: Graduate Courses of Reading and Research
 
  • Courses may have only one number. An FAS course may be listed in more than one FAS department, but only with permission of the concerned departments. Faculty will have access to a roster that includes enrollment for both classes. Both classes will emerge in the my.harvard course search results when searching for either of the two courses.
  • Faculty members are encouraged to submit a title of no more than 100 characters to appear on student transcripts and Course Search.
  • Course descriptions are limited to 4,000 characters. Since students often search for courses on mobile devices, however, we encourage faculty to limit the descriptions to 100 words.
  • Courses listed but not offered in the current academic year are designated by enclosing the course number and title in square brackets. Bracketed courses should include the term when it will be next offered and may also include the instructor's name. Courses may be bracketed for three consecutive years. After three years, the course should be scheduled or inactivated.
  • Faculty who limit the number of students who may enroll in a course are required by Faculty policy to approve student enrollment; that is, the course must require instructor consent and faculty will approve requests to enroll. It is possible, however, to require instructor consent even if the course is not limited in enrollment. The my.harvard Course Search will list capacity and instructor's permission as needed. All tutorials and 300/3000-level courses should have limited enrollments and require the instructor's permission to enroll.  
  • Faculty may consult the Registrar’s Office to learn about other enrollment control options, such as system enforced pre-, anti-, or co-requisites. Courses with requisites cannot also have instructor consent present, or the requisite will be nullified. 300/3000-level courses should add requsites or instructor consent but not both.  
  • A meeting time compliant with the FAS Schedule is necessary for all courses including, where possible, tutorials, laboratory sessions, and section meetings.
  • For purposes of cross-registration between Harvard Schools, courses that are jointly offered will be indicated in the my.harvard course search as "Jointly Offered."
  • Occasionally, two departments in the FAS may offer courses with similar content. Should faculty members conclude that two courses are of sufficient similarity to preclude students earning credit for both, notify the Registrar's Office to create an anti-requisite so students are unable to enroll in both courses for credit.

Special Types of Courses

The following distinctions reflect long-standing Harvard tradition and are offered as basic guidelines. 
 
Seminars and Conference Courses 

A seminar tends to focus on more advanced and/or specific research topics. It has few, if any, lectures and emphasizes student presentations, papers, and research. Enrollment is usually limited to 12 to 15 students. 

A conference course places more emphasis on discussion than research. It usually has an enrollment of about 25 students (35 maximum), meets once a week for 2-3 hours, and incorporates lectures, as well as student papers and research. 

In general, seminars and conference courses are open to advanced undergraduates as well as graduate students. Ordinarily, they do not have final examinations, nor do they qualify for teaching fellows. 
 
Tutorial Instruction (Undergraduates Only) 
 
Tutorials are opportunities for students to participate in small group or one-on-one instruction in their concentrations. They are generally characterized by their centrality in the concentration curriculum, by their sequencing, and by their emphasis on methodology and academic skills. 
 
All full-time faculty members are ordinarily expected to participate in the tutorial programs of the concentrations with which they are affiliated. Participation may involve individual or group tutorials, special seminars, or the direction of senior theses or projects. Although faculty-taught individual tutorials or group tutorials are ideal in many subject areas, departmental resources may be insufficient to accommodate these goals. When a tutorial is conducted by a teaching fellow, a designated faculty member should have ultimate responsibility, and that faculty member should oversee reading lists, discussion topics, and paper topics. From time to time, faculty members should participate in the tutorials for which they have accepted responsibility. (See Responsibility for Instruction and Responsibility for Evaluation.) 
 
Supervised Reading and Research Courses 
 
Undergraduates interested in supervised reading and research may enroll in courses offered by many departments under the designation of 91 or 910. Such courses are not Independent Study but regular courses with weekly or biweekly meeting times agreed upon by the instructor and student. Students enrolled in Reading and Research courses are expected to complete course work under supervision and not independently. Instructors of such courses must hold a teaching appointment. (See Responsibility for Instruction and Independent Study.) 
 
Graduate students enrolled in Reading and Research courses (300-level courses) do not receive letter grades but are graded SAT/UNS. Undergraduates may not enroll in courses numbered in the 300s or 3000s. However, Advanced Standing students in their fourth year of residence who are candidates for the master’s degree may enroll in such courses with the instructor’s permission. (See Undergraduates in Courses Designated Primarily for Graduates.)


Freshman Seminars 

Freshman Seminars are offered under the general supervision of the Committee on Freshman Seminars (www.freshmanseminars.college.harvard.edu). Freshman Seminars are designed to intensify the intellectual experience of incoming undergraduates by allowing them to work closely with faculty members on topics of mutual interest. Freshman Seminars are graded SAT/UNS, may not be audited, and enrollment is limited to the first two terms of First-Year students.
 
Independent Study (Undergraduates Only) 
 
Independent Study is designed to provide credit for field research, academic study not available in regular course work, or practice or performance in the arts. It is not suitable for group instruction, paid work, or activities outside the competence or concern of one of Harvard’s departments. Studying the financial accounting system of a business firm might be an appropriate project, but working in an accounting office to gain business experience would not by itself merit academic credit. Investigating child development through observation in a day care center could qualify, but simply tutoring a child would not. Analyzing the organization of a political group might be a suitable subject, but organizing a political campaign would not alone suffice. In each case what distinguishes the suitable project is the application of analytical skills to the object of the Independent Study, not the intrinsic worthiness or instructiveness of the experience itself. 

Any sophomore, junior, or senior whose previous record is satisfactory may petition to undertake Independent Study for non-letter-graded credit. A student may petition to take up to a total of four half-courses of Independent Study. Independent Study courses are subject to the same rules for dropping and withdrawing as any other course. 

A petition to undertake Independent Study, available on the Office of Undergraduate Education (OUE) website, requires two signatures: 
 
That of a qualified adviser (ordinarily a voting member of Harvard Faculty) who must be an officer of the University and whose professional competence is appropriate for the subject area of the Independent Study. In those exceptional cases where the adviser is not a faculty member - for example, a teaching fellow - the petition must also be supported by an appropriate academic department or unit. That of the Allston Burr Resident Dean, which signifies that the proposal satisfies the guidelines and has been signed by the adviser. Resident Deans will refer questions concerning guidelines to the Office of Undergraduate Education. 

The petition also requires an outline of the student’s proposed project. The full petition must be submitted to the Allston Burr Resident Dean for approval, ordinarily in the first week of the term. The completed petition paperwork, including the proposal, must then be submitted to the OUE, ordinarily before the enrollment deadline. Once final approval is granted by the OUE, the Allston Burr Resident Dean must lift the advising hold in my.harvard in order for the student to register. Any change-of-course petition that is filed to add, drop, or withdraw from Independent Study also requires the approval of the Allston Burr Resident Dean. A separate petition, properly completed, must be filed for each half-course of Independent Study. 

The adviser will assist the student in the development of a plan for Independent Study and provide guidance but not regular instruction. Independent Study does not imply formal instruction and should not be confused with tutorials, House Seminars, or with directed or Supervised Reading and Research courses offered by several academic departments and committees. (Supervised Reading and Research courses are generally numbered 91 or 910 and normally receive letter grades.) A student enrolled in Independent Study must undertake to work independently. Classroom work, regular instruction, and group projects are inadmissible. Students whose projects include interviews or research involving human subjects should contact the Undergraduate Research Training Program before submitting their independent study petition. 
 
The adviser will submit a midterm grade based on a preliminary written report by the student of his or her activities. At the beginning of the Reading Period, the student must submit to the adviser an analytical paper concerning the term’s work. A simple description or report of the term’s activities is not by itself adequate. In the case of artistic practice or performance, evidence of substantial accomplishment should be supplied in lieu of written work. 
 
The granting of credit will be determined by the adviser. In those cases where the adviser is not a voting member of a Harvard Faculty, then the Chair, Director of Undergraduate Studies, or Head Tutor of the department, or equivalent officer with voting membership in a Harvard Faculty, must review and approve the petition and the grade assigned by the adviser. Independent Study is graded “Pass” or “Fail.” The adviser will submit a copy of the student’s paper and a brief statement about his or her work for inclusion in the student’s folder in the Resident Dean’s office, ordinarily by the first day of the Examination Period. Independent Study is not counted toward General Education or divisional distribution requirements and is not normally counted toward concentration or secondary field requirements. 
 
First-year students may not enroll in Independent Study. They may, however, seek special permission from their Resident Dean of First-Year Students to enroll in one Supervised Reading and Research course within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (91r- and 910r-level course category) if an appropriate member of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has indicated a willingness to supervise. (See “Supervised Reading and Research Courses" within this section.)
 

 

Course Meeting Times

FAS Schedule Change Legislation 
 
The instructional day is organized around designated class start times and fixed pass times. All classes (including labs, discussions, etc.) must adhere to the designated class start times.  
 
Classes requiring up to 75 minutes in any single meeting shall begin from a specified subset of the designated class start times: 9:00am, 10:30am, 12:00pm, 1:30pm, 3:00pm, 4:30pm, 6:00pm, and 7:30pm.  
 
Classes, seminars, colloquia, and labs requiring more than 75 minutes in any single meeting shall begin from a specified subset of the designated class start times: 9:00 am, *9:45 am, 12:00 pm, *12:45 pm, 3:00 pm,*3:45 pm, and 6:00 pm. 
 
*Courses meeting for exactly two hours may begin at 9:45 am rather than be required to begin at 9:00 am, or at 12:45 pm rather than be required to begin at 12:00 pm, or at 3:45 pm rather than be required to begin at 3:00 pm. 
 
By Faculty vote, no class meeting, tutorial conference, examination, or other academic activity under the control of this Faculty and involving the presence of a voting member of this Faculty, and no meeting of any committee of this Faculty or any of its subdivisions, shall be scheduled on any of the days designated for meetings of the Faculty (usually the first Tuesday of the month, from 3 to 5 pm, October through May excluding January). Exceptions to this rule may be granted only by the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 
 
Please consult the amended FAS Schedule Change Faculty Legislation for more information. 
 
Holidays and Days Preceding and Following Holidays and Vacations 
 
FAS classes will be held on observed Veterans Day (check the Academic Calendar for the specific date). Otherwise, classes should not be held on holidays or during vacations. By vote of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, instructors are expected to hold regular classes on the days preceding and following holidays and vacations. Students should not be excused from class on those days or allowed to transfer temporarily from one section to another to accommodate a longer holiday or vacation. 


Courses Meeting Away from the University 
 

Ordinarily, courses should be organized to meet only in their regularly scheduled times, plus the additional times scheduled at the beginning of the term for sections and laboratories. In some cases, an instructor may wish to include a field trip or project that would take students away from the University on days when classes are normally held and, thereby, interfere with students’ ability to attend other courses. In such cases, permission to include activities that will take students away from the University must be obtained before the course may be listed as having a field trip component in the my.harvard Course Search. Instructors must consult with the Office of Undergraduate Education about courses below the 200- or 2000-level and with the Dean of the Graduate School about courses at or above the 200- or 2000-level. Ordinarily, instructors should plan no more than one class day away from the University in any given week and never more than five class days during the term, or ten days total including weekends. In all cases, the students’ obligations to other courses meeting at their regularly scheduled times must have priority over course requirements that take students away from the University. Instructors must announce at the beginning of a course any requirements that would take students away from the University so that students may consider these requirements when choosing their courses.

Reading Period
 

At the end of each term, a period of six or seven days prior to the start of the Final Examination Period is designated as Reading Period. Reading Period is intended to be a time for students to reflect, review, and synthesize what they have learned during the semester. In order to protect this educational purpose, the following rules apply during Reading Period:

  • With the exception of designated intensive language courses, no regular instruction may take place during Reading Period. Sections and review sessions may take place during Reading Period as may class sessions that must be made up due to weather or other emergencies.
  • Courses may not assign new material during Reading Period.
  • All seated final examinations, of whatever duration (up to three hours) or scope, must take place during the course's Exam/Final Deadline Group, as assigned by the Office of the Registrar.
  • Final papers, take-home exams, projects, presentations, and other culminating course assignments due after the end of regular classes must be due on or before the day of the course’s assigned Exam/Final Deadline Group, but no earlier than the fourth day of Reading Period. Final projects that include individual or group presentations may be scheduled beginning on the fourth day of Reading Period and may extend through the Final Examination Period.*
  • Short, regular assignments that address material covered in the last two weeks of classes (such as problem sets or response papers) may be due during the first three days of Reading Period.

Regardless of whether a class meets during Reading Period, that time is an integral part of the term. Students are expected to remain in the immediate vicinity of Cambridge throughout this period.

* Each course will be assigned an Exam/Final Deadline Group to spread out student deadlines and to establish grading due dates. While instructors may establish earlier deadlines per faculty legislation, the spirit of this policy is to spread students’ final assignment deadlines across the entire exam period to avoid having all assignments due at the same time. If an instructor decides to use an earlier deadline it is very important that students are well informed about this change from the posted deadline.

Examination Period

Courses that culminate in a final examination of any duration (up to three hours) must hold their exams during the designated Final Examination Period and during the Exam/Final Deadline Group assigned by the FAS Registrar's Office. There are two exam sessions each day: morning exams begin at 9:00 a.m. and afternoon exams begin at 2:00 p.m.

Classrooms

Classroom assignments for courses are coordinated between academic departments and scheduling offices.

Instructors should immediately contact their department if the meeting time changes from the published course listing in my.harvard or when a change in location occurs after the initial classroom assignment has been determined.

Course meeting times and locations are published in my.harvard, as well as course websites, the mobile shopping tool, and the University catalog. 

To make audio-visual equipment or service requests, instructors should contact Media and Technology Services. (See Instructional Media Services.)

After-hour emergencies and problems with the temperature or ventilation of classrooms should be referred to the University Operations Center (617-495-5560). Classroom maintenance or repair requests should be referred to your department administrator, to Harvard Yard Operations (617-495-8842), or to the appropriate building manager.

Office of the FAS Registrar
Academic Planning: Classrooms Office
Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center
1350 Massachusetts Ave., Suite 450 
Cambridge, MA 02138
classrooms@fas.harvard.edu
617-495-1541 
registrar.fas.harvard.edu

The FAS Classrooms Office schedules about one-third of the classrooms in the FAS room inventory. The remaining classrooms are scheduled by the departments, centers, and houses.

Course Classroom Assignments

Initial classroom assignments by the FAS Classrooms Office are made after considering a number of factors including instructional requirements, enrollment history, accessibility, special circumstances, and room availability at the time of assignment. Faculty members requesting classroom space scheduled by the FAS Classrooms Office should communicate their classroom needs for their courses and course-related events to department administrators, who compile and submit room requests to the FAS Classrooms Office in July (for the fall term) and October (for the spring term).  Department administrators or course coordinators should enter classroom preferences in the desktop client of EMS.  Trainings will be held prior to due date for all new employees or those who need a refresher course.  The Classrooms Office will evaluate preferences and supply tentative assignments to each department.  Once the department has reviewed the assignments, classroom assignments will be sent to instructors and faculty members.

Assigned classrooms for courses and section meetings are  reserved from the first day of the term through the last day of the term.  Courses and section meetings will NOT be scheduled through the Reading Period, unless requested by teaching staff via FAS RoomBook. During the Examination Period, all classrooms are reserved for Final Exams. Classrooms are not reserved during University holidays and recesses.

Classroom Reassignment

Due to the fluctuation of enrollment during the shopping period, the FAS Classrooms Office typically does not reassign classrooms until after the Registration deadline, when initial enrollment figures are more accurate. However, if, after the first day of classes, there seems to be an urgent need to change room assignments, contact the FAS Classrooms Office immediately (617-495-1541). As a reminder, room assignments are subject to change due to enrollment numbers or other pedagogical needs.

Discussion Sections

Instructors should direct their Head Teaching Fellows to the FAS Registrar’s website to access “Guidelines for Requesting Section Space”. Classrooms for discussion sections are reserved on a first come, first served basis.

Reading Period

If instructors would like to hold class during the Reading Period, they must reserve a classroom via FAS RoomBook as their course will not be scheduled through the Reading Period. 

Examination Period

During the Final Examination Period, all classrooms are reserved for the FAS Exams Office. After the final examination schedule is set, limited classroom space may become available for review sessions.

Visitor’s Guide to Larger Lectures

Each term, the FAS Office of the Registrar produces the Visitor’s Guide to Larger Lectures. This guide is available to visiting prospective students and their parents through the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid website. Any instructor who does not wish to have his or her course listed in the guide should contact the FAS Classrooms Office no later than the enrollment deadline.

Non-Course Event: Due to the fluctuation of enrollment during the shopping period, and the several relocations of courses that occur as a result, the FAS Classrooms Office does not book rooms within its purview for non-course events until the course meeting locations have been finalized, usually within two weeks of the enrollment deadline.

FAS Registrar’s Office Website

The following documents and links are posted to the website:

Courses

FAS Classroom Inventory

Discussion Sections

Course Materials/Syllabi

Faculty should post a complete course syllabus to the course website before the start of the semester so that students can make efficient use of the course selection period during the first days of the term with minimal disruption to classes. To provide online access to your syllabus, call the HUIT help line at 617-495-9000 and specify that you are interested in instructional support.

The syllabus should include a listing of course readings and materials. To control the escalating cost of reproducing coursepacks and sourcebooks, instructors are encouraged to determine whether the course readings they assign are available electronically from the Harvard libraries, and if they are, to link to them from course websites. For information on how to include links from your syllabus/course web page directly to readings available in electronic format, contact your department's Library Liaison or refer to E-Resources on the Harvard Libraries website. The Get Teaching Support for Your Courses page contains additional useful information for instructors.

In addition to a description of the course and its pedagogical goals, the syllabus should include contact information and office hours for teaching staff, a reading list, dates of hour/midterm exams, due dates for papers or other assignments, plans and expectations for Reading Period, course policy with respect to late work and makeup hour exams, and the basis on which the course grade will be awarded. It should also include a clear statement about plagiarism and collaboration. (See Papers and Other Written Assignments for a description of the policy and for template text for this portion of the syllabus.)

In selecting the dates for midterm examinations, as well as for papers and other assignments, instructors should be aware of the constraints of the academic calendar and should consult the information on religious holidays on the Harvard Divinity School's Multifaith Calendar. Instructors noting the possible dates of the course's final examination on the syllabus should also note on the syllabus that these dates are tentative until the final examination schedule is approved. Instructors are reminded of the policy that a three-hour final exam will not be scheduled for the course unless the Office of the Registrar is appropriately notified. For further information about final examinations, policy concerning alternative means of end-of-term assessment, and the process by which faculty should notify the Registrar if a three-hour exam is intended, see Final Examinations.

In courses designed for undergraduates it is helpful and beneficial for students to receive an evaluation on at least one course assignment before the seventh Monday of the term, the last day on which undergraduates may withdraw from a course. In addition, it is important to note any limitations on the credit earned by passing the course -- e.g., a full-year 8-credit course may not be divisible at midyear for 4 credits -- should  be made clear as part of the presentation of the course.

No substantial changes in the work load or calendar of a course should be made after the registration deadline each term.

Course Lists

As students enroll in courses, instructors will be able to view their course lists via their web-based portal pages at my.harvard.edu. After entering your HarvardKey on the authentication page, your portal page will appear.  Note that enrollment data are protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 and are therefore not for distribution. 

The online course lists are continually updated. Only when a student’s name appears on the course list is a student officially enrolled in a course. Instructors should report to the Office of the Registrar any student (other than auditors) who attends class, but whose name does not appear on the course list. Instructors should also report any student (except those with the status of “withdrawn”) who has stopped attending class, but whose name appears on the course list. These reports should be directed to the Office of the Registrar at 617-495-1519 or email enrollment@fas.harvard.edu.

Course Fees

No course may charge undergraduates special fees for course participation or required activities. Departmental budgets are expected to cover the cost of films, laboratory equipment and other materials. The aim of this policy is to ensure that all courses are equally accessible to students regardless of their financial means.

Student Enrollment

Drop, Add, Withdraw

Students are allowed five weekdays at the beginning of the term to attend courses in which they are considering enrolling. Students officially enroll through my.harvard.

No undergraduate may drop or add a course or change grading status in a course after the fifth Monday of the term. Undergraduates have until the eleventh Monday of the term to withdraw from a course. Exceptions to these rules may be granted only by the Administrative Board. Any course that a student drops by the deadline is removed from the student’s transcript. If a student withdraws from a course, that course remains on the transcript with the notation “WD.” Deadlines for graduate students are indicated in the Academic Calendar.

Instructor’s Permission and Petitions

Students wishing to enroll in courses that require the permission of the instructor will not be able to do so until the instructor admits them into the course via the permissions tool of my.harvard.  The instructor’s permission must be obtained for all undergraduate enrollments in graduate-level courses and for those that require the permission of the instructor.

Undergraduates adding a course after the Course Registration deadline or changing grading status to Pass/Fail must request permission via my.harvard. Permission is not required for dropping or withdrawing from a course. For graduate students, the instructor’s permission is required for adding or withdrawing from a course and is not required for dropping a course.

Instructors may not delegate their responsibility for approving course enrollments, change-of-course petitions, or submitting grades. Instructors are therefore asked to be available to students to discuss their course enrollment status and, when necessary, to grant permissions.

Limiting Enrollment in Courses at the 100- or 1000-Level and Below

As a general principle, students should be able to study the topics they want and for which they have the appropriate background, with the exception that concentration tutorials, including junior seminar programs, are ordinarily limited to concentrators. Nevertheless, there may be courses in which enrollment must be limited because of resource constraints or special instructional needs. The decision to limit enrollment for either or both of these reasons, as well as decisions about appropriate prerequisites, should be made by the instructional unit’s curriculum committee. The committee should be mindful of the general principle stated above, perhaps creating other venues where interested students can study the material in question.

When enrollment in a non-tutorial course is to be limited, the reason for the limitation should be reported to the Office of Undergraduate Education and the enrollment ceiling should be noted in the course catalog. The criteria for selecting among appropriately-qualified students for space in limited enrollment courses should be based on the curricular needs and interests of the students and on whether a student will have other opportunities to take the course. Selection on the basis of other criteria is inappropriate.

Enrollment of Non-FAS Students

Cross Registration

Students cross-registering from other Faculties or other institutions are allowed to enroll in FAS courses if they have obtained the instructor’s permission via the online cross-registration system. Instructors will be e-mailed with instructions when there are cross-registration requests awaiting your attention. Students registering from other Faculties or other institutions are subject to all of the FAS regulations and deadlines, including the examination schedule, and are graded according to the FAS system. The Pass/Fail option is not available to cross-registered students. The graduate student option to enroll in certain language courses on a SAT/UNS basis is also not available to cross-registered students.

Employees (Tuition Assistance Plan)

Employees of Harvard University may enroll in FAS courses through the Tuition Assistance Plan (TAP) administered by the Office of Human Resources. Employees are subject to all of the FAS regulations and deadlines, including the examination schedule, and are graded according to the FAS system. Employees are permitted to add or change a course once TAP and enrollment forms have been filed with the Office of the Registrar (Smith Center, 1350 Mass Ave) by the appropriate deadlines. The Pass/Fail option is not available to TAP students.

Auditing

Auditors are allowed in courses offered by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences only with an instructor’s permission. The following may be admitted as auditors: students enrolled in any Faculty of the University, individuals holding teaching appointments in the FAS, and their spouses. No official record is maintained for auditors.

Simultaneous Enrollment/Courses with Overlapping Meeting Times

*On August 13, 2020 The Educational Policy Committee suspended the faculty legislated policy on simultaneous enrollment for the duration of remote teaching and learning. The policy can be found in Harvard College Handbook for Students

A student may not enroll in courses that meet at the same time or overlapping times. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that there is no overlap in the meeting times of his or her courses. Exceptions to this rule may be granted only by the Administrative Board and will be considered only if the instructors in both overlapping courses agree and only in one or more of the following circumstances:

When the head of the course where class time is being missed and the person(s) providing the instruction during the regular class meeting agree to provide hour-for-hour direct and personal compensatory instruction. Availability during regular office hours or time with a different person does not satisfy the requirement for direct and personal contact.

When instruction in one of the courses is available on videotape, provided that (1) the course head agrees that the videotapes may be used for this purpose; (2) the lectures that are videotaped ordinarily do not provide opportunities for classroom discussion; (3) the videotapes will be available in a timely fashion so that they can be viewed before the next class period; (4) the student will miss attending part or all of no more than 1/3 of the instructional periods in the course (not including sections or labs) [N.B. if a student will miss any part of a day’s lecture, it is as though he or she will miss all of it]; and (5) the instructor in the course in which the lectures are videotaped agrees to offer any hour examinations or other in-class exercises at a time that will not preclude the student from attending the second course. In those courses that do not use the blackboard or other visual aids, course-provided audiotapes may be substituted for videotapes.

When a senior can meet degree requirements only by taking the two particular courses in question and will have no other opportunity to enroll in the courses before graduation, in such circumstances the Administrative Board may approve reasonable accommodations in consultation with the instructors of the courses involved.

Undergraduates in Courses Designated "Primarily for Graduates"

Undergraduates may not enroll in courses numbered in the 300s or 3000s (Graduate Courses of Reading and Research). The only exceptions to the latter rule are fourth-year Advanced Standing students who are candidates for the master’s degree and who may enroll in such upper-level courses with the instructor’s permission. Incomplete (INC) cannot under any circumstances be given to undergraduates.

Pass/Fail Grading Status (Undergraduates Only)

In 1967 the Faculty extended the use of Pass/Fail in order to permit students to enrich their educational experience by enrolling in courses they might otherwise avoid because of material that was too advanced or too unfamiliar. Consequently, with an instructor’s permission any undergraduate may enroll in a course on a Pass/Fail rather than a letter-graded basis. After the fifth Monday of the term students are not allowed to add Pass/Fail courses or to change their grading status in courses from or to Pass/Fail. Students enrolled in courses on a Pass/Fail basis are so identified on the course lists and grade sheets.

Instructors may not request that students enroll in a course on a Pass/Fail basis. The Pass/Fail option is not available to graduate, cross-registered, or TAP students.

Student Attendance

All students are expected to attend classes regularly. Absence from academic exercises for whatever reason, including representing the College in extracurricular and athletic activities, does not relieve a student from responsibility for any part of the work required by the course during the period of absence. Students who, by their classroom absence, neglect work in a course may be excluded from the course. (See Exclusion.)

Storm and Emergency Conditions

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences rarely cancels classes due to weather. However, faculty and section leaders who commute should not be expected to put themselves in danger during serious storms, and may choose to cancel their individual classes. Because the Faculty rarely cancels classes, it is important that course staff inform students at the start of the term of the procedures for learning of class meetings that will be canceled. Similarly, it is important that the course staff provide students with instructions on how to inform instructional staff of planned absences. Instructors might find the following information helpful in establishing storm and emergency procedures for their courses:

  • For the most part, undergraduate students are in residence and are expected to attend classes. Undergraduate students who decide that they cannot make it to class should be able to find in their course materials instructions on how to inform the course’s instructional staff of absences from class. For example, some courses request that the student inform the instructor or the teaching fellow of the planned absence by email or by telephone.
  • Similarly, students should be able to find instructions in the course materials that indicate how the instructional staff would inform students of the cancellation of a class or section meeting. For example, courses might inform students of the cancellation via an announcement posted at the course’s home page on the web, via an email to the class attendees, or by leaving a message on the voice mail system of a centralized departmental telephone.
  • FAS offices and academic departments will be open depending on staff availability and whether there are critical functions in progress. Call the central number for that office before going there.
  • Final examinations and makeup examinations are rarely cancelled by the College and students should report to their exam rooms on time.

Restricting Attendance

With the exception of classes held prior to Course Registration deadline, when any registered student may attend a class, ordinarily only students enrolled in a course and auditors who have been given specific permission by the instructor may attend course meetings. From time to time, instructors may permit other guests, such as colleagues, parents, alumnae/i, or prospective students, to attend individual class meetings; however, instructors are always free to restrict attendance at a class meeting or meetings to regularly enrolled students and authorized auditors. Each term the Registrar’s Office publishes the Visitor’s Guide to Larger Lectures. Copies of this guide are made available to visiting prospective students and their parents through the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid. Any instructor who does not wish to have his or her course listed in the guide should contact the Classrooms Office classrooms@fas.harvard.edu (617-495-1541) no later than the Course Registration deadline.

Senior Theses and General Examinations

Date for Submission of Senior Theses and General Examinations

The dates for submission of undergraduate senior theses and for concentration general examinations are set by the individual concentrations but must be early enough to enable the concentration to make its degree recommendations available to the Office of the Registrar during the first week of the Examination Period.

The dates for required language and general examinations for graduate students are set by the departments.

Students should be informed of these dates well in advance of the examination.

Hour and Midterm Examinations

The administration of hour and midterm examinations is the responsibility of the instructor; these exams should normally be scheduled during regular class meeting times. In cases where hour and midterm examinations must be given outside regular class meeting times, the course head must offer a makeup examination for documented academic conflicts. The FAS Registrar's Office has no role in the administration of hour or midterm examinations. Instructional staff is responsible for administering Accessible Education Office-approved accommodations, in consultation with AEO staff.

Instructors are required by law to offer makeup examinations to students who are absent from hour and midterm examinations for the observance of a religious holiday. Instructors are not required to offer makeup examinations to students who are absent from hour and midterm examinations for other reasons.

In cases other than absence for a religious holiday, if an instructor is satisfied that the absence is necessary and that omitting a grade for the missed hour or midterm examination will not affect the student’s course grade, final evaluation of the student’s work in the course may be determined from the remainder of the course work. The instructor may also elect to give a makeup examination. The responsibility for such decisions rests with the instructor only and not with the Dean’s Office or the Administrative Board. Instructors may also decide whether to require the attendance of graduate students at hour and midterm examinations.

Although instructors are obligated to offer makeup examinations only in the case of absence for the observance of a religious holiday, students who have obtained proper Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) documentation of illness may not be penalized for their absence from hour and midterm examinations. The appropriate form must be signed by a HUHS medical professional and given to the student’s Resident Dean who will write the student a letter acknowledging receipt of the HUHS form. This letter may be presented to the instructor as certification of the student’s illness.

Examination Booklets

Examination booklets for hour or midterm examinations may be obtained from the Science Center Mail Room (617-495-5347), Monday through Friday from 10:00am to 4:00pm. Course instructional staff can also contact the Exams Office (exams@fas.harvard.edu) to obtain examination booklets. A Harvard officer or faculty identification card must be shown to receive them.

Athletic Events

The Department of Athletics is aware that midterm examinations are frequently given in the seventh or eighth weeks of the term, and thereby schedules few athletic contests away from Cambridge during that time. Sometimes the academic calendars of other institutions require contests to be scheduled in these periods. However, absence from academic exercises in order to represent the College in athletic activities does not relieve the student from responsibility for any part of the work required in the course during the period of the absence.

Absences for Religious Holidays

A student who is absent from an hour or midterm examination as a consequence of his or her religious belief “shall be provided with an opportunity to make up such examination...” (Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 151C, Sec. 2B). It is therefore recommended that prior to setting the dates for such exercises or examinations course heads request dates of absence due to religious holiday observance from students in their classes. It is the responsibility of the students concerned to provide that information promptly when so requested. If conflicts are unavoidable, students who are absent from hour or midterm examinations for religious reasons shall be offered an opportunity to make up the work, without penalty, unless it can be demonstrated that such an opportunity would constitute an “unreasonable burden” on the faculty. Information on religious holidays can be found on the Harvard Divinity School's Multifaith Calendar.

Written Assignments

Papers and Other Written Assignments

One or more papers or other written assignments (e.g., problem sets, laboratory reports) are often included as part of the work required of students in their courses. Most students learn more effectively from a series of graduated writing assignments than from a single term paper, particularly in courses designed to introduce students to a new field or a particular mode of inquiry. The feedback that students receive on work completed early in the term helps to clarify what is expected in written assignments, and later assignments provide students the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned from the earlier comments.

The nature and number of written assignments and their due dates should be included on the course syllabus. All regular written assignments must be due by the last day of classes, though instructors may grant individual undergraduates an extension of time for medical reasons and other special circumstances up to the end of the Examination Period, but no later, and may grant graduate students an extension of time until the end of the next regular term. (See Late Work and Extension of Time for Course Work.) Incomplete (INC) cannot under any circumstances be given to undergraduates. This policy does not include written final assessments (take-home exam, final paper, etc.). For information on final assessment deadlines, please see Legislation on Reading and Exams Period section of Information For Faculty.

Plagiarism

Any material submitted to meet course requirements — homework assignments, papers, projects, examinations — is expected to be a student’s own work. Students are directed to Harvard Guide to Using Sources at the beginning of their first term, and in the required first-year writing course, Expository Writing 20; undergraduates are urged to take great care in distinguishing their own ideas and thoughts from information and analysis derived from printed and electronic sources. Although instructors are encouraged to take every opportunity to reinforce and develop these lessons, the final responsibility for knowing proper forms of citation rests with students.

In cases of suspected plagiarism by an undergraduate student, please contact the Associate Dean of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct. (See The Administrative Boards) In cases of suspected plagiarism by a graduate student, please contact the GSAS Dean of Students.

Collaboration

It is essential that instructors set out carefully in writing and at the outset of a course or course assignment the extent of permissible student collaboration in the preparation of papers, computer programs, or examinations. Students must assume that collaboration in the completion of assignments is permitted unless explicitly prohibited by the instructor. Students should be reminded that they are expected to acknowledge any collaboration and its extent in all submitted work.

Sample text for syllabus, if collaboration is not allowed:

Students should be aware that in this course collaboration of any sort on any work submitted for formal evaluation is not permitted.

If collaboration is to be allowed, the instructor may wish to define what is acceptable and what is not. Here is a possible approach:

You are encouraged to consult with one another on the choice of paper topics, and you may also share library resources. You may find it useful to discuss your chosen topic with your peers, particularly if you are working on the same topic as someone else, but you should ensure that the written paper you submit for evaluation is the result of your own research and reflects your own approach to the topic.

Submission of the Same Work to More than One Course

Papers and other work should normally be submitted to only one course. Any student who wishes to submit to another course or for another academic purpose the same or similar work used in a previous course must obtain the prior written permission of the instructor. If a student wishes to submit the same or similar work to more than one course during the same term, the prior written permission of all of the instructors involved must be obtained. A student who submits the same or similar work to more than one course without such prior permission will ordinarily be required to withdraw from the College or from GSAS.

Late Work and Extensions

Late Work and Extension of Time for Course Work

Undergraduates

Instructors have the authority to grant undergraduates an extension of time for medical reasons and other special circumstances up to the end of the Examination Period. Ordinarily, students requesting an extension of time to complete course work must have received the consent of the instructor before the final examination or before the final meeting of a course in which there is no final examination.

In deciding the length of an extension granted for medical reasons, the head of the course should apply the principle used by the Administrative Board when it votes extensions beyond the Examination Period: Extensions are granted for a period commensurate with the time missed during an illness, without penalty. Questions about an appropriate extension for an individual undergraduate may be addressed to the student’s Allston Burr Resident Dean or Resident Dean of First-Year Students.

If a student submits work after a grade has been filed with the Registrar but before the end of the Examination Period, and if acceptance of that late work results in a grade change, the instructor should submit a grade change at my.harvard.edu. (See Changes in Grades.)

An extension of time to complete course work beyond the end of the Examination Period can be granted to an undergraduate only by vote of the Administrative Board of Harvard College and only in exceptional circumstances. Instructors may not accept work from an undergraduate after the end of the Examination Period without the explicit authorization of the Administrative Board

Undergraduates cannot receive a grade of incomplete (INC).

Graduate Students

Instructors may grant graduate students an extension of time until the end of the next regular term. However, such extensions of time for completion of course work must be granted before the assignment of the course grade.

Midterm Grades for Undergraduates

Instructors teaching an undergraduate course are asked to report students making unsatisfactory progress to the Allston Burr Resident Dean/Resident Dean of First-Year Students. This process can also be used to communicate special concerns about a student to the Resident Dean even if satisfactory progress is being made. Instructors may submit progress reports from approximately the third week of the semester until final grading opens.

These progress reports go to the Allston Burr Resident Deans/Resident Deans of First-Year Students and are used only for advising and counseling purposes. They are extremely important for identifying students who may be facing any of a wide range of difficulties. Instructors are also asked to cooperate with the Resident Deans of First-Year Students and the Allston Burr Resident Deans regarding inquiries that they may make about the status of individual students. However, please note that instructors should also be in direct contact with any student making unsatisfactory progress.

March grades in full year courses extending from September to May should reflect the student’s current standing for the spring term. At the same time, instructors should report students whose cumulative grade for the entire year is unsatisfactory.

Instructional Support Staff

Hiring, Training, and Supervision of Instructional Support Staff

The teaching done by supervised instructional support staff is an important part of the undergraduate educational experience, as well as a critical aspect of the training of graduate students. Departments and individual instructors have developed successful strategies that encourage and ensure a high standard of instruction by teaching fellows, teaching assistants, and course assistants. These local strategies have been reinforced by guidelines developed by the Committee on Undergraduate Education and the Committee on Graduate Education and endorsed by the Faculty Council. All hiring, training, and supervision of graduate student teaching fellows and undergraduate course assistants falls under the HGSW-UAW collective bargaining agreement, effective July 1, 2020.  Please contact studentunionization@harvard.edu with any questions about the contract and its provisions.

Categories of Instructional Support Staff

Teaching fellows are candidates for advanced degrees and are registered as students at Harvard, ordinarily in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS). They serve as section leaders, tutors, and laboratory section leaders, but always under the supervision of instructors who hold Faculty-level teaching appointments in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) or another Harvard Faculty. (See Responsibility for Evaluation for the appropriate role of teaching fellows in the grading of students.)

Teaching assistants engage in the same kinds of supervised instruction as teaching fellows but are not enrolled as candidates for an advanced degree in any department of the University. Ordinarily, teaching assistants will have received at least the AB before the appointment begins.

Undergraduate course assistants are currently registered Harvard undergraduates who, under the supervision of instructors who hold Faculty-level teaching appointments in the FAS or another Harvard Faculty, assume limited instructional responsibilities. Course assistants ordinarily assist only in mathematics, science, and computer science courses. (See Responsibility for Evaluation for the appropriate role of course assistants in the grading of students.)

In accordance with the Faculty’s own policy, course heads should appoint qualified GSAS students for teaching positions before hiring non-GSAS candidates.

Teaching Fellow Appointment Guidelines

The Committee on Graduate Education and the Faculty Council have adopted the following general guidelines for the Teaching Fellow appointment process in the humanities and social sciences:

1. Early Allocations of Sections: Each spring, on the basis of prior enrollment histories, the Office of Undergraduate Education (OUE) in Harvard College will pre-allocate course sections for eligible departmental courses for both terms of the coming academic year. Departments should then provide information on available teaching positions to eligible graduate students as early as possible. Please note that pre-allocated sections are not guaranteed (see below for more information on the possible reassignment of teaching fellows).

2. Application Period: Departments should accept applications for teaching fellow positions for several weeks to ensure the broadest possible applicant pool before a decision is made. To avoid financial inequities, final decisions should involve consultation between the course head and the Chair or Director of Graduate Studies, or other designated member of the Department or program.

3. Hiring Criteria and Timetable: The criteria for appointing teaching fellows should include an evaluation of each candidate’s preparation, English language proficiency, student graduate year, teaching experience, teaching guarantee (see note below), and satisfactory academic standing. Note in this regard that GSAS: 1) requires all incoming PhD students who are non-native speakers of English and who have received their undergraduate degrees from non-English speaking institutions pass English proficiency tests before they can be appointed as teaching fellows, and; 2) prohibits graduate students who receive Dissertation Completion Fellowships from teaching as well as taking on concurrent employment. Further details on English language requirements and dissertation completion fellowships for teaching fellows may be found in the "Teaching" page of the GSAS website.

The following paragraphs detail the appointment process:

Each spring, the OUE will request that departments submit their enrollment estimates and course section requests for the coming academic year via the on-line section allocation tool (SAT). The OUE will make its pre-allocations directly in the SAT. After the course enrollment deadline, the SAT will automatically display actual enrollment numbers, which the OUE will use to make adjustments to section allocations. For questions or further details about this process, contact the Office of Undergraduate Education (instruct@fas.harvard.edu).

Departments should make teaching fellow appointments by the end of the spring term for the coming academic year. Preference for teaching fellow appointments should be given to students to whom a guarantee of teaching was offered at admission (see note below).

After those students who are expected to teach as part of their funding packages have been accommodated, departments and course heads are expected to consider and prioritize all other qualified applicants from within GSAS; special attention should be paid to qualified applicants from related departments and disciplines.

Written notification should be provided to each successful applicant making explicit the teaching assignment and the terms of the teaching appointment, as well as expectations for training and orientation, and satisfying the requirements of the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Applicants who are not appointed as teaching fellows should be informed in writing at the same time so that they can make alternative arrangements for financial support before the academic year begins. If a student who has been offered an appointment receives funding from another source or for other reasons declines the opportunity, that appointment may be offered to another GSAS student after direct consultation with GSAS, and in accordance with the priorities described above.

An important note on teaching "guarantees": As an integral part of their graduate funding packages, PhD students in the Humanities and Social Sciences are ordinarily guaranteed two sections of teaching per term for four terms (prior to their sixth year); meeting this guarantee should be seen as a cooperative endeavor between the student and program.

As soon as possible in the semester, departments should reassign teaching fellows from courses that are under-enrolled to those that are over-subscribed, within certain limits. Reassignments should be made on the basis of the graduate student’s prior indication of courses or areas in which he or she is prepared to teach. Departments should offer reassignments in ways that will minimize the number of teaching fellows with multiple preparations. If no reassignment is possible, the financial commitment will be honored, even if no instructional support is needed in the course. In this case, the teaching fellow should perform meaningful work for the department or committee, preferably in support of undergraduate instruction. Such reassignment must be approved by the Office of Undergraduate Education (instruct@fas.harvard.edu).

Finally, be aware that immigration regulations limit the employment of international students to twenty hours per week while school is in session. This limitation also applies to teaching fellowships and research assistantships. Therefore, international students’ teaching cannot exceed .57 FTE time during each term.

For additional information about teaching fellow appointments, please refer to the "Teaching" page of the GSAS website.

Training and Supervision of Instructional Support Staff

A number of principles have been formulated to assist departments in the training and supervision of instructional support staff.

Departments should develop regular procedures for screening and training instructional support staff as well as routine methods of supervising and monitoring their performance. Not only do such practices help to maintain good standards, but they also encourage graduate students, in particular, to improve their teaching skills. Student teaching should be a rewarding opportunity rather than an automatic step in graduate education.

The Faculty Council has adopted the following guidelines for the training and preparation of first-time instructional support staff:

  1. All departments and instructional programs must develop plans for preparing and orienting first-time instructional support staff in the pedagogical skills that will allow them to fulfill their teaching obligations. Training is considered part of the total workload of graduate student teaching fellows and undergraduate course assistants.
  2. Orientation in issues of appropriate professional conduct should also be provided, and departments must provide a thirty-minute slot for the Union to introduce itself to teaching fellows (contact studentunionization@harvard.edu for more information). (See Professional Conduct.) These plans should be approved by the Office of Undergraduate Education. These plans should provide for practice teaching or other orientation to teaching methods at or before the start of the teaching appointment for those without prior teaching experience, and should also provide for the observation and appraisal of teaching performance. The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning offers a wide range of instructional support and professional programs for Harvard College’s classroom instructors. Departments are encouraged to have their new and experienced teaching fellows and instructional support staff utilize these resources. Detailed information about the Bok Center's resources and programs can be found at https://bokcenter.harvard.edu/graduate-students.
  3. Individual course heads remain responsible for the orientation, preparation, oversight, and evaluation of assistants in the execution of their specific course responsibilities. 
    Instructional support staff should be provided with structured teaching assignments, with the recognition that section teaching is more effective the more the instructor is involved. Regular, perhaps weekly, meetings to review course material, visits by the instructor to sections, and the teaching of a section by the instructor can be helpful to instructional support staff. In certain departments, some or all of these forms of involvement are routinely expected. Departments may adjust the teaching credit given to Faculty members, if need be, to encourage their involvement in section teaching. The Office of Undergraduate Education’s “instructional lunch fund” is available to support weekly luncheon meetings with instructional support staff. The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning encourages instructors and instructional support staff to seek help in improving their teaching quality.

By vote of the Faculty on October 17, 1995, teaching fellows and other instructional support staff are expected to attend lectures of the courses in which they hold teaching appointments, unless in the judgment of the course head the nature of their work for the course does not depend upon their attendance at the lectures.

Departments should devise a record-keeping system on instructional support staff based on instructors’ reports on and observations of their performance. Such departmental monitoring can be used to reward outstanding teaching and to provide a solid basis upon which to recommend graduate students for future teaching jobs. At the same time, regular evaluation ensures that a poor teaching performance does not go unnoticed.

Student Compensation and Credit for Course Work

A student may not receive course credit for the same work for which he or she is financially compensated.

Graduate students may enroll in departmentally designated 300(0)-level courses to have their teaching, research, or independent study efforts recognized and recorded (formerly designated by enrolling in TIME-T, TIME-R, and TIME-C). These courses are typically ungraded and will appear on students’ GSAS transcripts.  

An undergraduate course assistant may not receive academic credit in any form, including Independent Study and Supervised Reading and Research course credit, for courses with which he or she is assisting. (Research for which a student receives a grant may inform their academic work. Research performed for other financial compensation may inform academic work in subsequent semesters only, and only with the express permission of the employer, including a laboratory head.)

Special Considerations Concerning the Appointment of Undergraduate Course Assistants

Because special considerations enter into the appointment of undergraduates as course assistants, instructors should observe the following guidelines when hiring and supervising course assistants:

  • Departments and committees that employ undergraduate course assistants should consult with the candidate’s Allston Burr Assistant Dean to confirm that the candidate has attained sophomore standing and has earned a cumulative GPA of 3.33 or higher. Departments may also wish to consult with the candidate’s Allston Burr Assistant Dean and academic adviser about the candidate’s ability to successfully balance the duties of the course assistant position with his or her other commitments.
  • Under faculty supervision, undergraduate course assistants may lead sections or problem-solving sessions and assume other limited instructional duties. Over the term, they may work an average of 10-12 hours per week. However, undergraduate course assistants may not take on any administrative responsibilities for a course, such as those typically held by a head teaching fellow.
  • Under faculty supervision, undergraduate course assistants may evaluate other students’ assignments when the grading involves objective assessment, such as checking answers on a problem set. However, undergraduate course assistants may not grade other students’ work when that work requires subjective assessment, such as evaluating essays, written portions of examinations, or final projects.

Also, as undergraduates may fail to recognize the implications of serving in an instructional role, instructors should take special responsibility for initiating discussions about professional conduct, including the impropriety of amorous relationships with students and the importance of both equity and confidentiality.

Q Course Evaluation

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences oversees a process of course evaluation of undergraduate and graduate courses each term. This evaluation process serves several purposes. It provides feedback from students to the head of a course about course structure, the quality of the instruction, and the nature of assignments. It also provides important feedback for instructional support staff, many of whom are in their early years of teaching and benefit from the comments of students. Participation in the course evaluation process is required of all faculty in courses with 5 or more students. The course evaluation process itself takes place online.

Students who, for whatever reason, submit work either not their own or without clear attribution to its sources will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including requirement to withdraw from the College. Students who have been found responsible for any violation of these standards will not be permitted to submit a Q evaluation of the course in which the infraction occurred.

Summary statistics and comments submitted by students are accessed electronically by the course heads, instructors, teaching fellows, teaching assistants, and course assistants of evaluated courses after final grades for the term have been submitted (Q.fas.harvard.edu). Course evaluation results are also made available to the chair of the department or committee offering the course. Both faculty and instructional support staff, particularly teaching fellows, should keep this information as it will be useful later as an input for promotion decisions and as part of consideration for other teaching positions. These evaluations will be part of the graduate student’s electronic teaching record. Finally, aggregate numerical data and limited text results are also made available to students, providing them with additional information for use in their course selection process. Students can access the course evaluation results through the online course selection tool at my.harvard.edu.

The Office of Undergraduate Education reviews the forms for any member of the instructional support staff whose average "overall" rating raises concerns about the quality of instruction. In these very few cases, the Dean of Undergraduate Education may send a letter to that instructor, copied to the course head(s), urging him or her to seek appropriate advice on how to improve his or her teaching. If members of the instructional support staff receive such cautionary letters a second time, they may be prohibited from further teaching in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Examinations

Final Examinations

It is the responsibility of faculty members to determine the best means of assessing the work of students in their courses. One option available to them is a seated three-hour written final examination during the Final Examination Period at the date, time, and location scheduled by the Office of the Registrar, proctored by the course's instructional staff. Such examinations are subject to the following rules:

To earn credit for a course or to count the course toward fulfillment of the requirements for a degree, the student must have attended the final examination or an approved makeup. A student’s unexcused absence from a final examination will ordinarily result in a failing grade for the course (ABS). The course head is not empowered to excuse student absences from final or makeup examinations scheduled by the Registrar. Furthermore, the course head may not give a final examination at a special time to accommodate the needs of an individual student or authorize the substitution of another exercise for an examination. Undergraduate students who request special accommodations should be directed to their Resident Deans, who in turn will facilitate submission of the request to the Administrative Board for consideration. Graduate students should be directed to the FAS Registrar.

Students are entitled to complete course requirements and to take the final examination. They must not be discouraged from doing so, even when previous course work has earned a cumulative failing grade. Only a student whose serious and persistent neglect of academic work has led to formal exclusion from the course is ineligible to take the final or makeup examination. (See Exclusion)

Legislation on Reading and Examination Periods

Examination Categories

Examination Scheduling

Examination Groups and Dates

Administration of Examinations

AEO Examinations

Religious Conflicts

Examinations in Absentia

Makeup Examinations

Legislation on Reading and Examination Periods

Legislation on Reading and Exams Period (effective July 1, 2014)

Reading Period

At the end of each term, a period of six or seven days prior to the start of the Final Examination Period is designated as Reading Period. Reading Period is intended to be a time for students to reflect, review, and synthesize what they have learned during the semester. In order to protect this educational purpose, the following rules apply during Reading Period:

  • With the exception of designated intensive language courses, no regular instruction may take place during Reading Period. Sections and review sessions may take place during Reading Period as may class sessions that must be made up due to weather or other emergencies.
  • Courses may not assign new material during Reading Period.
  • All seated final examinations, of whatever duration (up to three hours) or scope, must take place during the course's Exam/Final Deadline Group as assigned by the Office of the Registrar. (See also, section on Final Examination Period below.)
  • Final papers, take-home exams, projects, presentations, and other culminating course assignments due after the end of regular classes must be due on or before the day of each course’s assigned Exam/Final Deadline Group, but no earlier than the fourth day of Reading Period. Final projects that include individual or group presentations may be scheduled beginning on the fourth day of Reading Period and may extend through the Final Examination Period.*
  • Short, regular assignments that address material covered in the last two weeks of classes (such as problem sets or response papers) may be due during the first three days of Reading Period.

Regardless of whether a class meets during Reading Period, that time is an integral part of the term. Students are expected to remain in the immediate vicinity of Cambridge throughout this period.

* Each course will be assigned an Exam/FinaDeadline Group in order to spread out student deadlines and to establish grading due dates. While instructors may establish earlier deadlines per faculty legislation, the spirit of this recent change is to spread students’ final assignment deadlines across the entire exam period to avoid having all assignments due at the same time. If an instructor decides to use an earlier deadline it is very important that students are well informed about this change from the posted deadline.

Final Examination Period

Courses that culminate in a final examination of any duration (up to three hours) must hold their exams during the designated Final Examination Period and during the Exam/Final Deadline Group assigned by the Registrar’s Office. There are two exam sessions each day: morning exams begin at 9:00 a.m., and afternoon exams begin at 2:00 p.m.

Examination Categories

At the beginning of each term, course heads will be asked to submit Final Assessment Information in my.harvard for each course they teach. Final assessment options include the following examination categories:

  • Final Examination for All Students 
    All students enrolled in this course are expected to write a seated three-hour examination scheduled by the FAS Registrar's Office during the Final Examination Period and proctored by instructional staff of the course. 
     
  • Final Examination for Undergraduate Students 
    All undergraduates will write a seated three-hour examination and all graduate students will be given alternative assessment (paper, project, take-home examination, etc.). All alternative assessment deadlines must comply with the course’s assigned Exam/Final Deadline Group. 
     
  • Final Examination for Certain Students 
    A seated three-hour examination will be given to a certain academic grouping of students in the course, while another grouping of students will be given an alternative means of assessment (paper, project, take-home examination, etc.). All alternative assessment deadlines must comply with the course’s assigned Exam/Final Deadline Group
     
  • Final Examination Combinations
    A seated three-hour exam may be combined with another final assessment option, such as: students may complete either a seated three-hour examination or a take home exam; students may complete either a seated three-hour examination or a final paper. All alternative assessment deadlines must comply with the course’s assigned Exam/Final Deadline Group.

Completion of Work in Courses without Three-Hour Examination

Course heads should not assign any work to be done during the Final Examination Period. Faculty policy stipulates that this time should be reserved for standard three-hour exams or other final assessments. Assignments other than final examinations or other final assessments must be completed by the last day of classes. (See Legislation on Reading and Examination Periods.)

Take-Home Final Examinations

Take-home examinations must be due on or by the course’s assigned Exam/Final Deadline Group. Course heads should be careful to explain to students in writing the extent of collaboration and any source materials that may be permitted in the preparation of the examination.

Examination Scheduling

Each course is assigned an Exam/Final Deadline Group, which indicates when the course’s final assessment is due, whether it be a take-home exam, paper, or the date of a seated final exam. The Exam/Final Deadline Group is listed in the my.harvard Course Search. The Exam/Final Deadline Group corresponds to course meeting patterns and ordinarily will change if the course’s meeting pattern changes. The FAS Registrar's Office is unable to accommodate individual requests to assign an alternative Exam/Final Deadline Group to courses.

Since course meeting patterns are subject to change, the official dates and times for seated three-hour examinations are published on the Final Examination Schedule posted on the Registrar’s website. The Final Examination Schedule only includes courses that have requested a seated three-hour final examination scheduled by the FAS Registrar's Office. The Final Examination Schedule will be available in late-September for fall semester final examinations and in late-February for spring semester final examinations.

 

Examination Groups and Dates

The table below shows the dates associated with each of the Exam/Final Deadline Groups. For most courses, an Exam/Final Deadline Group is listed in the my.harvard course search. The Exam/Final Deadlines Group corresponds to course meeting patterns and ordinarily change if the course meeting pattern changes. Occasionally, the FAS Registrar's Office may need to assign an Exam/Final Deadline Group that does not correspond to the meeting pattern of a course. All students are therefore advised that they should not make any travel plans until the official Final Examination Schedule is published on the Registrar’s website. Students are expected to be in residence for the duration of the Final Examination Period. For the fall term, the Final Examination Period is Thursday, December 10 through Saturday, December 19. For the spring term, the Final Examination Period is Thursday, May 6 through Saturday, May 15.

Exam/Final Deadline Group

Fall 2020 Final Examination

Spring 2021 Final Examination

FAS01

Thursday, Dec. 10

Thursday, May 6

FAS02

Thursday, Dec. 10

Thursday, May 6

FAS03

Friday, Dec. 11

Friday, May 7

FAS04

Friday, Dec. 11

Friday, May 7

FAS05

Saturday, Dec. 12

Saturday, May 8

FAS06

Saturday, Dec. 12

Saturday, May 8

FAS07

Monday, Dec. 14

Monday, May 10

FAS08

Monday, Dec. 14

Monday, May 10

FAS09

Tuesday, Dec. 15

Tuesday, May 11

FAS10

Tuesday, Dec. 15

Tuesday, May 11

FAS11

Wednesday, Dec. 16

Wednesday, May 12

FAS12

Wednesday, Dec. 16

Wednesday, May 12

FAS13

Thursday, Dec. 17

Thursday, May 13

FAS14

Thursday, Dec. 17

Thursday, May 13

FAS15

Friday, Dec. 18

Friday, May 14

FAS16

Friday, Dec. 18

Friday, May 14

FAS17

Saturday, Dec. 19

Saturday, May 15

FAS18

Saturday, Dec. 19

Saturday, May 15


*Please ignore the alpha characters listed at the end of the Exam/Final Deadline Groups, for example, FAS01_A.

Administration of Examinations

Seated final examinations are scheduled by the FAS Registrar’s Office and are administered by instructional staff of the course. Instructional staff must follow the exam procedures that are provided by the FAS Registrar’s Office. The procedures are intended to protect the security of examinations and to ensure that students undertake the writing of their exams in an environment free of distractions and disturbances. There are two exam sessions per day during the Examination Period: morning examinations start at 9 am and afternoon examinations start at 2 pm.

Course Head Obligations during the Administration of Exams:

  • The course instructional staff is expected to be familiar with and abide by the guidelines governing examination administration in FAS.
  • The course instructional staff is expected to proctor their own main exams.
  • A member of the instructional staff should be present in the examination room at least fifteen minutes before the start of the exam.
  • All courses are expected to handle the printing and photocopying of their own examinations.
  • All courses are expected to make arrangements for the delivery, set-up and collection of any audio/visual media equipment needed to facilitate the administration of oral/aural components of the examination.
  • The course instructional staff is responsible for obtaining attendance slips and if needed, examination booklets, prior to the start of the examination.
  • The course instructional staff is expected to take attendance at the examination and to report absences to the FAS Registrar’s Office after the completion of the examination using the Exam Roster located on the my.harvard Teaching and Advising tab. 
  • The instructional staff of the course should retrieve the following items from the examination room at the time of examination completion:
    • completed examination booklets
    • scrap booklets
    • all other course materials (slides, audiotapes, etc.)
  • Report any unusual circumstances to the FAS Registrar’s Office.
  • If there are any scheduled out of sequence examinations for the course, the course head must submit the exam to the FAS Registrar’s Office at least 48 hours before the first scheduled out of sequence exam.

Examination Office Responsibilities during the Administration of Exams:

  • Solicit course final assessment information from faculty each examination period via the Final Assessment button on the my.harvard Teaching and Advising tab.
  • Establish the examination schedule for each examination period, including date, time and location.
  • Schedule examination classroom assignments for each examination period.
  • Coordinate the distribution of attendance slips and examination booklets.
  • Collect absence information after examination completion.
  • Report examination absences for undergraduate students to the appropriate Resident Dean.
  • Hire proctors for out of sequence examinations.

Course Head Obligations after the Final Examination:

  • Instructors should take every precaution to prevent the accidental loss of examination booklets. For example, under no circumstances should examination booklets be removed from the neighborhood of the University. If a course head has temporarily left the Cambridge area, only photocopies of the booklets should be sent to the course head for grading.
  • Examination booklets not returned to students should be kept for one year after the end of the course.
  • Most instructors return exam booklets, papers, and other academic work to the student enrolled in their courses. By law, students have the right to review all materials submitted to a course, including final examination booklets and, for a reasonable charge, may have copies of any originals not returned to them, within 45 days of the date of the original request.

AEO Examinations

Accessible Education Office Examinations

Exam accommodations are determined by the Accessible Education Office (AEO) and are intended to address documented disabilities or health conditions in such a way as to make exam administration fair and equitable for all students taking the same course.

The administration of all timed exercises during the term, including midterms, is the responsibility of the course head; AEO is happy to confer with the course head when implementing arrangements. All seated final examinations for students with AEO-approved exam accommodations are administered during the Final Examination Period by the FAS Registrar’s Office and the appropriate accommodations will be made in conjunction with AEO.

Timed exams administered online through Canvas should be modified by faculty to include the approved extended time for students with these accommodations. For assistance with this process, please see:  Canvas Instructions for Extended Time

For assistance with converting examinations into alternative formats (e.g. digital text, Braille, or enlarged text), please contact the Assistive Technology Center (ATC) at atc@fas.harvard.edu or 617-496-8800. Arrangements for reformatting examinations should be made least five business days in advance.

Seated final exam administration is consistent with FAS exam procedures, with the following exception to ensure proper implementation of AEO-approved accommodations: all AEO exams typically begin at 10:00 am on the same day as the main exam, unless there is a scheduling conflict with another exam. In such instances, the FAS Registrar’s Office will administer the exam at an appropriate time, typically within 24 hours of the main exam.

For questions concerning appropriate exam accommodations, please contact AEO at aeo@fas.harvard.edu or 617-496-8707.

For questions concerning the administration of final exams (e.g. dropping-off/picking up exams, location of AEO students, etc.) please contact the FAS Registrar’s Office at exams@fas.harvard.edu or 617-495-1542.

Religious Conflicts

Religious Conflicts with Final Examinations

In accordance with Massachusetts law, students who are unable to participate in a final examination as a consequence of their religious beliefs shall be provided with an opportunity to make up the examination, without penalty, provided that the makeup examination does not create an unreasonable burden on the College. Students are expected to anticipate any religious conflicts with exams and report the conflict using the Religious Out of Sequence Exam Request Form found on the Exams page of the FAS Registrar’s Office website thirty days prior to the start of the Final Examination Period. Conflicts reported after the deadline may not be possible to accommodate or may result in a makeup exam scheduled for the following term. Please direct any questions to the FAS Registrar’s Office at exams@fas.harvard.edu.

Examinations in Absentia

Students, who for sufficient reason cannot be within 500 miles of Cambridge at the time of a seated final or makeup examination, may request to take the examination in absentia (at another location). Undergraduate in absentia examinations must be approved by the Administrative Board, and students must contact their Resident Dean to facilitate the petitioning process. Graduate students should contact the FAS Registrar’s Office. Student applications for in absentia exams should be submitted thirty days prior to the start of the Final Exam Period. Under extraordinary circumstances, the Administrative Board may grant examinations in absentia after the deadline has passed.

In absentia examinations are ordinarily administered at the same time and date as the examination in Cambridge and must be proctored by someone approved by the FAS Registrar’s Office. After determining that these conditions can be met, the FAS Registrar’s Office will work with the course head to facilitate the administration of the examination. For reasons of equity, the examination given to the student in absentia must be identical to that given at the regular examination in Cambridge. The examination should be returned to the FAS Registrar’s Office in Cambridge immediately after it has been administered.

Makeup Examinations

The Administrative Board of Harvard College has sole jurisdiction over granting makeup examinations for undergraduates. The FAS Registrar’s Office has been authorized by the Graduate School to approve or deny makeup petitions for graduate students. Course heads may not give a makeup final examination without notification from the FAS Registrar's Office (see Special Senior Makeup Examinations below for exception). Moreover, course heads may not give a makeup examination at any time or location other than that specified by the FAS Registrar’s Office. The granting of a makeup examination by the Administrative Board does not imply that the student may receive credit for any assigned work in the course not submitted by the end of the Examination Period.

Makeup examinations are ordinarily granted by the Administrative Board in cases of medically documented illness or extraordinary circumstances over which the student had no control, such as a death in the family. Makeups are sometimes granted to undergraduate participants in intercollegiate competition, but only when out of sequence or in absentia examinations cannot be arranged. By vote of the Faculty Council, makeup examinations may also be granted when a student who is in good standing in the course misses an examination because of inadvertence, provided the petition is supported by the course head and filed on time. Undergraduate and graduate students in the FAS may be granted a makeup examination on the grounds of inadvertence only once during each tenure at Harvard.

If called upon to do so, course heads must prepare appropriate makeup examinations and grade them. Makeup exams are usually administered at the beginning of the following term based on the schedule established by the FAS Registrar’s Office. Ordinarily, a makeup examination should not be a duplicate of the original exam. Course grades dependent upon makeup examinations should be reported to the FAS Registrar’s Office no later than one week after the date of such examinations.

Makeup midterm examinations are not granted by the Administrative Board or the FAS Registrar’s Office. Offering such makeup examinations or substituting other work is at the discretion of the course head, except in the case of an absence for the observation of religious holidays. (See Hour and Midterm Examinations.) The FAS Registrar’s Office has no role in midterm examinations.

Special Senior Makeup Examinations

Graduating seniors who are absent from a spring term final exam in the last semester before graduation are permitted to write a makeup final exam as soon as possible. The scheduling and administration of the special senior make up exam are arranged by the graduating senior and the faculty; neither the Registrar’s Office nor the Administrative Board make provisions for the special senior make-up exam, although faculty may want to work with the student’s Resident Dean in arranging the exam. In the cases of special senior makeup exams, time is of the essence. The student and the teaching staff should arrange the special make up exam in a timely manner to ensure meeting the Registrar’s grades submission deadline for graduating seniors.

 

Grades

The Grading System

The Registrar is authorized to obtain from instructors reports on the performance of students in the form of the grades established by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Online grade entry forms are available to instructors and must be submitted by the indicated due dates. (See the Due Dates charts for fall and spring later in this chapter.) The Faculty of Arts and Sciences uses the following system of letter and non-letter grades to evaluate undergraduate student work:

Letter Grades: Undergraduate Students

  • A, A- Earned by work whose excellent quality indicates a full mastery of the subject and, in the case of the grade of A, is of extraordinary distinction.
  • B+, B, B- Earned by work that indicates a good comprehension of the course material, a good command of the skills needed to work with the course material, and the student’s full engagement with the course requirements and activities.
  • C+, C, C- Earned by work that indicates an adequate and satisfactory comprehension of the course material and the skills needed to work with the course material and that indicates the student has met the basic requirements for completing assigned work and participating in class activities.
  • D+, D, D- Earned by work that is unsatisfactory but that indicates some minimal command of the course materials and some minimal participation in class activities that is worthy of course credit toward the degree.
  • E Earned by work which is unsatisfactory and unworthy of course credit towards the degree.

Non-letter Grades: Undergraduate Students

Incomplete (INC) cannot under any circumstances be given to undergraduates.

  • ABS Students who miss a regularly-scheduled final examination scheduled by the Office of the Registrar during the Final Examination Period are given a failing grade of Absent (ABS) which will be changed only if the student is granted and takes a makeup examination. Unexcused absences are counted as failures. (See Final Examinations.) No other grade can be accepted. Final assessments not scheduled by the Registrar's Office, including take-home examinations and special final projects, are not "regularly-scheduled" examinations; therefore, ABS cannot be used in these cases. If, after an absence from a regularly scheduled final examination, a student is granted a makeup examination by the Administrative Board, the appropriate grade is then submitted after completion of the examination.
  • EXLD A notation of Excluded (EXLD) indicates that the student was not permitted to continue in the course by vote of the Administrative Board of the College and received no credit. Exclusion from a course is equivalent in all respects to failing it and in and of itself makes the student’s record for the term unsatisfactory.
  • EXT Instructors may allow students extensions of time to complete course work up to the last day of the Examination Period. After that date, only the Administrative Board may grant extensions of time for undergraduates to complete course work. (See Late Work and Extension of Time for Course Work.) Until the date of extension set by the Board, a final grade should not be reported by the instructor; instead, the designation EXT (Extension) should be reported on the grade sheet. EXT is only a temporary notation. When the allowed time for late work has passed, or if additional time is not granted by the Administrative Board of the College, the instructor should officially inform the Registrar of the final grade. Students who miss a regularly scheduled final examination scheduled by the Office of the Registrar must be given an ABS (Absent), not an EXT.
  • PA/FL The grade of Pass represents letter grades of A to D-; the grade of Fail represents the letter grade of E only. Students admitted to a course on a PA/FL basis are so identified on the grade sheet. For such students, only a grade of Pass or Fail can be accepted by the Registrar. Independent Study is always graded PA/FL.
  • SAT/UNS The grade of Satisfactory includes letter grades from A to C-; the grade of Unsatisfactory represents work below C- and is considered a failing grade. No students enrolled in courses graded SAT/UNS may receive letter grades in those courses.

The following junior and senior tutorials must be graded SAT/UNS:

African and African American Studies 99
Applied Mathematics 99r
Chemistry 91r, 98r, and 99r
English 99r
Folklore and Mythology 99
French 99
German 99
Government 99r
History 99
History and Literature 99
History of Art and Architecture 99
History of Science 99a and 99b
Italian 99
Latin American Studies 99
Linguistics 99a, 99b
Literature 98a, 98b, 99a, and 99b
Mathematics 60r
Philosophy 99
Portuguese 99
Psychology 985, 990, 992, and 993
Religion 99
Romance Studies 99
Scandinavian 99
Slavic 99a, 99b
Social Studies 99
Sociology 99
South Asian Studies 99
Spanish 99
Special Concentrations 99
Studies of Women, Gender, Sexuality 99a, 99b

All Freshman Seminars are graded SAT/UNS.

Certain House Seminars may also be graded SAT/UNS, provided instructors inform the Standing Committee on Freshman Seminars of their intentions at the time the House Seminar proposals are submitted, and all students in a particular seminar are graded on the same scale.

In addition, SAT/UNS may be reported as a midyear grade in any full year tutorial or half-course extending throughout the year which does not give a midyear examination. In this case only, Unsatisfactory may be used to indicate passing-but-unsatisfactory work. Assigning an unsatisfactory midyear grade will make the student’s record for the term unsatisfactory and subject to review by the Administrative Board.

The instructor must obtain permission from the Office of Undergraduate Education (for courses below the 200- or 2000-level) or Dean of the Graduate School (for courses at the 200- or 2000-level) before grading SAT/UNS for any course not listed above.

Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory Undergraduate Studies

Grades of C- or higher, as well as the grades of PA and SAT, are passing and satisfactory grades. Grades of D+ through D- are passing but unsatisfactory grades. Grades of E, ABS (Absent), FL (Fail), UNS (Unsatisfactory), and EXLD (Excluded) are failing grades. All undergraduate student records with any unsatisfactory or failing grade are reviewed at the end of the term by the Administrative Board, which responds to such records in the manner described in the appropriate sections of the Handbook for Students and in the Administrative Board Guide for Students. Responses may include a period of academic probation or a requirement to withdraw from the College for a year.

Letter Grades—Graduate Students

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences uses the following letter grades: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E. A grade of E is a failing grade.

The minimum standard for satisfactory work in the Graduate School is a “B” average in each academic year. A grade of “C” or “INC” is offset by a grade of “A” and a “D” by two “A’s”; no account is taken of plus or minus. Grades of “E” or an unexcused “ABS” are failing. A grade of “UNS” is unsatisfactory. A course in which a student receives an “E” or permanent “INC” or “ABS” may be retaken for credit at a later time, in which case both grades will appear on the student’s transcript. In many departments, students are expected to maintain an average well above the GSAS minimum.

Letter grades are to be used in every case except as follows:

Non-letter Grades—Graduate Students

Graduate students are not allowed to take courses on a Pass/Fail (PA/FL) basis.

  • ABS The designation ABS (Absent) is used in the case of a student who is absent from a regularly scheduled final examination scheduled by the Office of the Registrar during the Final Examination Period. No other grade can be accepted. Final assessments not administered by the Registrar’s Office, including take-home examinations and special final projects are not “regularly scheduled” examinations; therefore, ABS cannot be used in courses with take-home final exams. If, after an absence from a regularly scheduled final examination, a student is subsequently granted a makeup examination by the Associate Registrar, the appropriate grade is then submitted after completion of the examination. A special grade sheet is provided for this purpose.
  • EXC Graduate students may be excused from a final examination or other course assignments by their division, department, or committee Chairs on the basis of having passed departmental examinations or other requirements. At the written request of a Chair, the Associate Registrar of Records and Requirements records the grade of EXC (Excused). If students elect to take the final examination and complete the course, they receive a letter grade.
  • INC For graduate students only The instructor has the prerogative of approving an extension of time for completion of course work beyond the end of the term. The appropriate grade in this situation is INC (Incomplete), not EXT (Extension). In order to have the grade of INC changed to a letter or appropriate non-letter grade, the graduate student must complete the work of the course before the end of the next regular term. An INC which has not been completed by that time will become a permanent grade, unless the student successfully petitions for an extension of time. This petition requires the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies and of the Dean of the Graduate School. When a student has made up an INC within the allowable time period, the instructor should immediately inform the Registrar of the grade in writing. If the instructor reports the grade after the deadline for completing the work has passed, the instructor must include the date on which the student submitted the work to the instructor. Failure to affirm to the Registrar that the student completed the work on time will render the grade unacceptable.
     
  • SAT/UNS For graduate students, Satisfactory indicates that the course was passed with distinction (B- or above). Graduate courses of Reading and Research (300-level courses) must be graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. No other courses may be graded on a SAT/UNS basis with the exception of designated foreign language courses. Graduate students must petition to obtain permission from the instructor to take a language course on a SAT/UNS basis. Graduate students admitted to a course on a SAT/UNS basis are so identified on the grade sheet.

Student Request for Review of an Assigned Grade

Both undergraduate and graduate students may request that an instructor review a grade that has been received and may also ask to consult with the Chair of the department or committee offering the course. However, final authority for the assignment of grades rests with the course head.

Once a grade has been reported to the Registrar, it can be changed by submitting a request of the instructor to the Registrar, acting on behalf of the Dean of Harvard College (or the Dean of the Graduate School in the case of 200- or 300-level courses). The Registrar must be satisfied that all students in the course will have been treated equitably before authorizing any grade change. Grade changes may be submitted electronically.

Grade Point Averages

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences averages its letter grades with a 4-point scale: A = 4.00, A- = 3.67, B+ = 3.33, B = 3.00, B- = 2.67, C+ = 2.33, C = 2.00, C- = 1.67, D+ = 1.33, D = 1.00, D- = 0.67. E, ABS, UNS, EXLD = 0. The grade point average is the numerical average of all grades received in courses taken under the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for degree credit, including courses taken for credit in the Harvard Summer School and cross-registration courses as appropriate. Passing grades received for courses given by other Harvard Faculties or MIT will not be used in computing a student’s grade-point average except when the courses are counted toward concentration requirements or taken in the Graduate School of Education as part of Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP). Grades received for course work done out of residence will not be used in computing the grade-point average. Grade-point averages are calculated on both a cumulative and annual basis.

Submission of Grades

Submission of Final Grades

During the final examination period, instructors should not leave the vicinity of Cambridge until their course grades have been submitted to my.harvard. Because the course head is responsible for the grades given by his or her assistants, it is important that the course head closely supervise grading. (See Responsibility for Evaluation.) Each grade roster for a course must be posted on my.harvard as soon as possible but no later than the due date noted.

Due Dates for Grades

Mid-Term Grades/UNSAT Reports 2020-2021 
Unsatisfactory mid-term progress of undergraduates should be reported online from the third week of the semester until final grading opens. Undergraduates making unsatisfactory progress, or for whom you have other concerns, should be reported in the Mid-Term Reporting function at my.harvard. You do this in the course roster. Click here for instructions. This is a critically important action needed to support our students.
 
Due Dates for Fall Final Grades 2020-2021
Final grades for all fall courses with or without final examinations, including 300-level courses, must be submitted on-line based on the due date associated with their assigned Exam and Course Deadline Group as detailed below. Click here to see the deadlines listed by course.
 
FALL 2020
Exam/Student Deadline Group Exam Date Grades Due
FAS01 Thursday, Dec. 10 Dec 17 (Thur)
FAS02 Thursday, Dec. 10 Dec 17 (Thur)
FAS03 Friday, Dec. 11 Dec 18 (Fri)
FAS04 Friday, Dec. 11 Dec 18 (Fri)
FAS05 Saturday, Dec. 12 Dec 18 (Fri)
FAS06 Saturday, Dec. 12 Dec 18 (Fri)
FAS07 Monday, Dec. 14 Dec 21 (Mon)
FAS08 Monday, Dec. 14 Dec 21 (Mon)
FAS09 Tuesday, Dec. 15 Dec 22 (Tue)
FAS10 Tuesday, Dec. 15 Dec 22 (Tue)
FAS11 Wednesday, Dec. 16 Dec 23 (Wed)
FAS12 Wednesday, Dec. 16 Dec 23 (Wed)
FAS13 Thursday, Dec. 17 Dec 28 (Mon)
FAS14 Thursday, Dec. 17 Dec 28 (Mon)
FAS15 Friday, Dec. 18 Dec 28 (Mon)
FAS16 Friday, Dec. 18 Dec 28 (Mon)
FAS17 Saturday, Dec. 19 Dec 28 (Mon)
FAS18 Saturday, Dec. 19 Dec 28 (Mon)


Due Dates for Spring Final Grades 2020-2021

Final grades for all spring courses with or without final examinations, including 300-level courses, must be submitted on-line based on the due date associated with their assigned Exam and Course Deadline Group as detailed below. Click here to see the deadlines listed by course.

 

SPRING 2021
Exam/Student Deadline Group Exam Date May Degree grades due Non-Degree grades due
FAS01 Thursday, May 6 May 10 (Mon) May 13 (Thur)
FAS02 Thursday, May 6 May 10 (Mon) May 13 (Thur)
FAS03 Friday , May 7 May 11 (Tue) May 14 (Fri)
FAS04 Friday , May 7 May 11 (Tue) May 14 (Fri)
FAS05 Saturday, May 8 May 12 (Wed) May 15  (Sat)
FAS06 Saturday, May 8 May 12 (Wed) May 15 (Sat)
FAS07 Monday, May 10 May 14 (Fri) May 17 (Mon)
FAS08 Monday, May 10 May 14 (Fri) May 17  (Mon)
FAS09 Tuesday, May 11 May 15 (Sat) May 18 (Tue)
FAS10 Tuesday, May 11 May 15 (Sat) May 18 (Tue)
FAS11 Wednesday, May 12 May 16 (Sun) May 19 (Wed)
FAS12 Wednesday, May 12 May 16 (Sun) May 19 (Wed)
FAS13 Thursday, May 13 May 17  (Mon) May 20 (Thur)
FAS14 Thursday, May 13 May 17 (Mon) May 20 (Thur)
FAS15 Friday, May 14 May 18 (Tue) May 21 (Fri)
FAS16 Friday, May 14 May 18 (Tue) May 21 (Fri)
FAS17 Saturday, May 15 May 19 (Wed) May 22 (Sat)
FAS18 Saturday, May 15 May 19 (Wed) May 22 (Sat)

 

Session Final Grade Due Dates 2020-2021

 

Session Final Grade Due Date

F1

October 26, 2020

F2

December 11, 2020

JAN @ GSAS

February 1, 2021

S1

March 24, 2021

S2

May 7, 2021

Submitting Late Grades

Grades must be submitted online to the Office of the Registrar on or before the due date noted. Instructors will receive automated email reminders if grades are not submitted by published date. If grades remain outstanding the matter will be referred to the appropriate Dean’s office.

 

Final Grades in Indivisible Courses

Final Grades in Indivisible Courses

Final grades in indivisible courses are always cumulative—that is, they represent the standing of the students from the beginning of the first term of the course, not merely during the second term. The fall grade will appear on the transcript with a designation such as “A*” (with an explanation on transcript) and not factor into the GPA; faculty may also choose “IP” for “in progress.” The fall grade will be replaced by the spring grade at the time the spring grade is entered. Once the spring course has been graded that grade will appear on the transcript and be used to calculate GPA with all academic credits.

Final Grades for Degree Candidates

Grades for degree candidates must be submitted online by the date specified. Degree candidates are listed separately on the grading portal and they have an earlier due date. Grades submitted online are final and may not be changed except as indicated Changes in Grades.

Changes in Grades

A grade that has been reported may be changed by requesting a grade change in my.harvard. The request should include an explanation for the grade change. If a grade change is requested because of a clerical error or misunderstanding of Faculty rules concerning the grading structure, the appropriate dean will ordinarily authorize the Registrar to change the grade. In the case of a grade change due to judgmental error, the instructor is expected to review the work of other students in the course or relevant section(s) to determine that grade equity would be maintained if the grade change were approved. When late work is the basis of a grade change request, it is essential that the work have been received by the deadline set by the Faculty: the end of the Examination Period for undergraduates or the end of the next regular term for graduate students. After submitting a grade change request, faculty will receive two emails: the first acknowledges that the submission of a grade change request, and the second confirms that the Registrar has approved or denied the grade change request. Grade change instructions in my.harvard are explained here.

Although the grades of degree candidates are reported before those of other students, these grades are considered final and are subject to the same regulations for changes.

 

Posting of Grades

It is the Faculty’s legal responsibility to maintain confidentiality of student grades and also of materials upon which evaluations are made. For this reason, instructors should not post grades by student name or student identification number. Furthermore, instructors should never make a student’s submitted work, such as problem sets, exam booklets, or papers, accessible to anyone other than the student who has submitted it, unless specifically authorized to do so by the author.

Approximately six business days after the end of the final examination period, students can begin viewing their final and midyear grades via my.harvard. However, students who complete online evaluations for all courses in which they were enrolled for the term will be provided early online access to their final course grades. Faculty will not be provided online access to their course evaluation results until they have submitted their grades.

Retention of Exam Booklets and Course Records

Most instructors return exam booklets, papers, and other academic work to the students enrolled in their courses. Work that is not returned to students must be kept in a safe, accessible location on campus for at least one year after the end of a course. By law, students have the right to review all materials submitted to a course, and for a reasonable charge, may have copies of any originals not returned to them. Course heads should be sure to collect from section leaders and tutors any course assignments that have not been returned to students for appropriate storage. Faculty who are leaving the FAS or who will be on leave and away from the University should make appropriate arrangements for maintaining the availability of students’ work.

Addressing Student Problems

The Administrative Boards

The Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct houses both the Administrative Board and the Honor Council and is responsible for dealing with concerns pertaining to undergraduates at the College.

The Administrative Board of Harvard College has the responsibility for reviewing all unsatisfactory undergraduate records and disciplinary cases involving social misconduct for possible action. The Board also votes on all student petitions for makeup examinations as well as exceptions to the academic rules described in the Harvard College Handbook for Students. The Board is composed of the Dean of Harvard College, the Resident Deans of First-Year Students and Allston Burr Resident Deans for the twelve upperclass Houses (see below), and several administrative and teaching members of the Faculty. For additional information, see both the Handbook for Students and the Administrative Board website.

The Honor Council handles matters dealing with academic integrity and violations of the College’s Honor Code. The Council is composed of faculty, students, and staff and chaired by the Dean of Harvard College. For additional information, see both the Handbook for Students and the Honor Council website. 

The Administrative Board of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences reviews and rules on all matters of discipline and unsatisfactory student performance as well as exceptions to the rules contained in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Handbook. The Board is composed of the Dean of the Graduate School, the Administrative Dean, six teaching members of the Faculty, the Registrar, the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, the Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid, and the Student Affairs Officer. Up to four graduate students serve on the Board when it is considering appeals of financial aid and teaching fellow appointment decisions.

The Allston Burr Resident Deans and Resident Deans of First-Year Students

Working with the Dean of Harvard College are the twelve Allston Burr Resident Deans, one in each of the Houses. These Resident Deans are directly responsible for the academic and personal welfare of undergraduates. The Associate Dean of Students and the four Resident Deans of First-Year Students have the same responsibilities for first-year students. The Coordinator of Transfer and Visiting Student Programs fulfills such responsibilities for visiting undergraduates.

Whenever instructors have a concern about an undergraduate, they are urged to contact the appropriate Resident Dean. Students’ House affiliations or first-year status are indicated on course lists. A list of Resident Deans may be found in the FAS Directory.

Graduate School Office of Student Affairs

Instructors with concerns regarding graduate students’ academic or personal welfare should contact the Office of Student Affairs in The Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center, Room 350 (617-495-1816). This office is directed by the Dean of Students, who has general responsibility for the welfare of graduate students and monitors students’ academic status. The Dean represents students in disciplinary cases before the Administrative Board of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Neglect of Academic Work

Neglect of Academic Work by Students: Exclusion

A student who is neglecting course work should be warned in writing that he or she risks exclusion from the course and that exclusion is equivalent to a failing grade. A copy of the instructor’s warning must be sent to the Secretary of the Administrative Board of Harvard College in the case of an undergraduate and to the Dean of Students in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in the case of a graduate student. If the student continues to neglect academic work after receiving this written warning, the instructor should then send a second letter requesting exclusion to the Secretary or Dean of Students as appropriate, who will forward it to the Administrative Board for action. Upon the Board’s approval of the exclusion petition, the student is denied any right to further course evaluation, including final and makeup examinations.

It is to the advantage of both the student and faculty member to address early a case of gross neglect of course work. An undergraduate has the option of withdrawing from the course before the seventh Monday of the term. Beyond that date there remain only a few weeks for the instructor to pursue the process of warning and exclusion or, conversely, for the student to recover much lost ground.

Faculty policy gives the Administrative Boards no choice but to grant a makeup exam to any student who remains in a course until the end of the term and presents a medical excuse, signed by an appropriate Harvard University Health Service (HUHS) staff member, for missing the final examination. This policy applies even when circumstances clearly indicate the student’s gross neglect of academic work during the term.

Reports of Unsatisfactory Records

Reports of Undergraduates with Unsatisfactory Records

Instructors teaching an undergraduate course are asked to report students making unsatisfactory progress to the Allston Burr Resident Deans/Resident Deans of First-Year Students by using the “Mid-term Reports” tool. (Unsatisfactory grades are: D, E, EXLD, FL, UNS, ABS. See The Grading System.) This process can also be used to communicate special concerns about a student to the Resident Dean even if satisfactory progress is being made. Instructors may submit progress reports from approximately the third week of the semester until final grading opens.

These progress reports go to the Assistant/Resident Deans and are used only for advising and counseling purposes. They are extremely important for identifying students who may be facing any of a wide range of difficulties. Instructors are also asked to cooperate with the Resident Deans of First-Year Students and the Allston Burr Resident Deans regarding inquiries that they may make about the status of individual students. However, please note that instructors should also be in direct contact with any student making unsatisfactory progress.

March grades in full year courses extending from September to May should reflect the student’s current standing for the spring term. At the same time, instructors should report students whose cumulative grade for the entire year is unsatisfactory.

Dishonesty in Course or Academic Work

Students Charged with Dishonesty in Course or Academic Work

Although instructors have the responsibility for evaluating students’ academic performance, the Faculty has granted jurisdiction over matters of student dishonesty to the GSAS Administrative Board and the College's Honor Council. Therefore, any instance of possible student dishonesty in course work should be reported at once.

If an undergraduate is involved, the incident should be reported to the Dean of Harvard College (through the Secretary of the Honor Council of Harvard College). After a preliminary investigation, the faculty member, in consultation with the Secretary of the Council and the Department Chair or his/her designee(s), can determine whether a “local sanction” is appropriate; if so, the Secretary of the Council will be available to provide advice to the faculty member as to how similar offenses have been treated in the past. Any local sanction imposed by the faculty member will be reported to the Council by the Secretary. In all instances in which it is determined that a local sanction is not appropriate the case will be referred to the Council.

If a graduate student is involved, the incident should be reported to the Dean of Student of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. After a preliminary investigation, the faculty member, in consultation with the Dean and the Department Chair or his/her designee(s), can determine whether a “local sanction” is appropriate; if so, the Dean will be available to provide advice to the faculty member as to how similar offenses have been treated in the past. Any local sanction imposed by the faculty member will be reported to the Administrative Board by the Dean. In all instances in which it is determined that a local sanction is not appropriate the case will be referred to the Board.

Each case involving possible student dishonesty that goes to the Honor Council or Administrative Board will receive a careful hearing. Action taken by either body can range from “scratch” (the Council/Board decides that no disciplinary action is warranted) to requirement to withdraw or even a recommendation to the Faculty that the student be dismissed. In cases involving undergraduates who have misused source materials in the preparation of course work, the Honor Council of Harvard College will often recommend and make available appropriate instruction on the proper use of sources and footnotes.

Students have a right to expect that grading will not be used as punishment for alleged academic dishonesty that has not been confirmed by the Honor Council or by the Administrative Board. Students may ask the Council/Board, through their Allston Burr Resident Dean/Resident Dean of First-Year Students in the case of undergraduates, or through the Dean of Students in the case of graduate students, to investigate and resolve informal allegations of academic dishonesty that have not been brought to the attention of the Council/Board.

Troubled Students

Instructors are not responsible for counseling students on personal or emotional difficulties, even when those problems affect academic work. Undergraduate students who seem to be unusually upset or who are in need of special help should be referred to their Allston Burr Resident Dean or Resident Dean of First-Year Students. Instructors are encouraged to call the Allston Burr Resident Dean/Resident Dean of First-Year Students to discuss their concerns about a particular undergraduate. Concern about a graduate student should be referred to the Dean for Student Affairs (617-495-1814). The Counseling and Mental Health Service of the Harvard University Health Services (617-495-2042) and the Academic Resource Center are also available to help troubled students, both undergraduate and graduate.

Administrative Sports Liaisons

Athletics and Administrative Sports Liaisons

The Harvard College Dean’s Office, Administrative Board, and Department of Athletics collaborated to develop a policy that limits the number of class days and weekend days that may be missed per semester on account of athletic competition. Controls and approval processes are in place to ensure that communication between an athlete and his or her Resident/Allston Burr Assistant Dean occurs prior to travel from campus. Athletes are ultimately responsible for resolving academic/athletic scheduling conflicts directly with academic faculty and staff. Program Managers, designated by the Athletics Director and assigned to each team, are available to assist athletes with the compliance of these policies and procedures. Questions regarding these policies should be directed to Nathan Fry, Senior Associate Director of Athletics (617-495-4992), nfry@fas.harvard.edu.

Teaching Resources

Advising Programs Office

Advising Programs Office of Harvard College

Smith Campus Center, Fourth Floor
617-496-0218 
advising.college.harvard.edu
advising@fas.harvard.edu

The Advising Programs Office (APO) cultivates quality academic advising for all Harvard College undergraduate students. The APO promotes the intellectual and personal transformation of students across the four years by encouraging exploration, reflection and informed decision-making about curricular and co-curricular choices and opportunities. The APO creates trainings, resources, and programs for a cohort of advisers which include faculty, administrative and residential staff, and upperclass students. The APO collaborates with colleagues in academic departments, partner departments in the Office of Undergraduate Education, the Dean of Students Office, and other constituents to ensure that students and advisers are well informed.

During the 2020-21 academic year, all academic advising will be conducted virtually.

The APO works with the following adviser roles:

Board of First-Year Advisers

First-Year Adviser is a faculty member, administrator, or Proctor at the University who helps first-year students select courses and advises on questions regarding the curriculum, academic requirements, educational goals, summer opportunities, and extra-curricular interests. 

Peer Advising Fellows Program

Peer Advising Fellows (PAFs) are upperclass students who are assigned to first-year students to facilitate their transition to College and their acclimation to Harvard. PAFs advise students on extra-curricular and social experiences and refer first-year students to other resources when appropriate. PAFs are expected to have thorough knowledge of campus resources so that they know where to send advisees for information in each concentration. Finally, the PAFs play a key role in helping to build community within the entryway and dormitory by working with the Proctors and each other on study breaks, other entryway activities, and dorm-wide events.

Sophomore Advising

Each sophomore is assigned a sophomore adviser, who serves as the primary academic adviser guiding students in choosing courses for the third semester, exploring and selecting a concentration, and reflecting on co-curricular opportunities including research, study abroad, public service, and internships. Sophomore advisers connect students to resources and guide students in how to pursue their interests. Concentrations will assume primary academic advising responsibility for sophomores in the fourth term, while House sophomore advisers will continue to offer on-going academic advising as students explore curricular and co-curricular endeavors outside of the concentration. Each House appoints a Sophomore Advising Coordinator to manage this work and plan House-based advising events for sophomores.

Concentration Advising

Concentration advising seeks to guide students in three phases: into an appropriate set of introductory courses in the field of study, to advanced work in the field of study and, when applicable, through a final project or thesis in the senior year. Each concentration plays an important role in pre-concentration advising through collaborative efforts with the Advising Programs Office and the Houses. Students are encouraged to begin exploring concentrations in the first-year especially during the Exploring Fields of Study program in the spring where students are invited to attend concentration events and meet with advising teams. In the third term, sophomore advisers encourage students to seek out information from the concentration advising teams before the declaration deadline in November.

Once sophomores select a concentration, their primary academic adviser will be assigned based on the policies of their concentration. Most use a team approach: the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) or Head Tutor, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies (ADUS) or Assistant Head Tutor, and Undergraduate Coordinator (UGC) will advise various students, splitting duties as needed depending on the student, situation, and time. Some concentrations make use of the House Tutors to advise students by House, coordinating with the Faculty Deans in the hiring process.

Each concentration has its own requirements. Several of the humanities and social science concentrations have a tutorial system (ranging from one to five semesters), and many students receive additional advising from their tutorial leaders.

Advising resources website and my.harvard.edu

Students can access records tracking their academic progress in the my.harvard Student Information System. In the “Advising Network” tab, students will find the photos, names, and contact information for all of their assigned advisers. They can also view their Academic Advising Report which outlines their progress towards completing the requirements for their degree and other important advising materials, such as score reports from placement exams. Students’ advisers can also access the my.harvard portal to see the photos, names, and contact information for all of their advisees. Advisers are strongly encouraged to update and consult the “Advising Journal” frequently to facilitate communication between the advising network team.

 

Graduate Student Advising

Advising is a crucial aspect of the graduate student experience, an activity that is central to the successful completion of a graduate student’s education. As an advisor, it is your responsibility to ensure that your advisee receives the guidance they need to successfully navigate their academic training, graduate in a timely manner, and enter the profession of their choosing. Advising graduate students is a privilege, and the relationship you develop with them will affect their time at Harvard and their ultimate career.

As an advisor, you may feel you don’t have all the answers: The Advising Project is available to help. The Advising Project is an in-depth initiative launched in fall 2019 by Emma Dench, Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, focused on improving the advising experience of master’s and PhD students at GSAS. We are in the process of creating a suite of resources, developing various tools, and organizing workshops. We encourage you to reach out to The Advising Project for more information.

GSAS students are enrolled in 58 different graduate programs; each student’s experience is unique, meaning that each advising relationship is unique. While no single advising approach can be applied universally, several recommendations can be put into practice in all advising relationships.

Setting Expectations

During your first meeting with your advisee, discuss expectations:

  • How often will you meet?
  • How long will your meetings normally last?
  • What are your expectations for communication? Email? Office visit?
  • How long should a student wait for a reply to a communication before following up?
  • What your role as an advisor will cover and who else in the program or at Harvard can help with their academic training.

Be sure to revisit these expectations regularly as the student progresses through their academic stages. And remember that, no matter how positive a relationship you have with your advisee, they will recognize that a power differential exists. Do what you can to create an environment in which the student will be comfortable discussing difficult topics.

Communicate Available Resources

GSAS students have access to GSAS and other Harvard resources that will help them during their graduate careers. Examples include the Fellowships & Writing Center, Office of Career Services, Accessible Education Office, and Academic Resource Center. Familiarize yourself with these resources so that you can refer to them at various points in the student’s career. If your advisee has an overall concern, you can direct them to Danielle Farrell, director of student services.

Faculty should also be aware of issues of diversity, inclusion, and belonging, understanding that a student’s identities can impact their sense of belonging in the program and at Harvard. Reach out to GSAS’s Office of Diversity and Minority Affairs for more information and guidance.

Advising Network

Advisors should be the student’s primary point of contact, but effective advisors recognize that students benefit from multiple perspectives. Connect them with other faculty members or program staff who may inform their project and provide fresh perspectives.

Bok Center for Teaching and Learning

The Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning

50 Church Street, Suite 308
Phone: 617-495-4869
Email: bokcenter@fas.harvard.edu

 

The Bok Center offers faculty, graduate students, and other instructors a wide variety of resources and programming to foster excellence in teaching and learning. We strive to promote a culture of experimentation, collaboration, and reflection about teaching, and to support instructors in creating equitable and inclusive learning environments.  The Center supports faculty in designing their courses and syllabi, in developing their classroom presence, and in exploring evidence-based strategies to promote learning. For the 2020-21 academic year, we have adapted our work to support instructors with teaching remotely; we offer workshops as well as individualized advice about adapting courses and adopting technologies for effective online teaching. The Bok Center’s Learning Lab collaborates with faculty to create and implement innovative assignments and course activities. Additionally, faculty speakers share ideas about teaching at a series of faculty lunches, and a peer observation program provides early-career faculty with a supportive community of colleagues with whom they can share experiences and materials as they develop as instructors.  

The Bok Center also offers PhD  students a robust slate of professional development programming. Early-stage PhD students look to the Bok Center as they prepare to teach, and may attend our Fall Teaching Conference or Winter Teaching Week for an introduction to the foundations of teaching, or take a Bok Seminar to explore topics in teaching, learning, and communication. We serve international students and scholars who want to improve their oral English communication skills to prepare for the language and culture of the Harvard classroom through our Professional Communication Program for International Teachers and Scholars. Advanced PhD students can demonstrate their commitment to developing as teachers in higher education by pursuing one of our Teaching Certificates or by applying to our Fellows programs, where we partner with departments to enhance training and support for graduate student teachers across the FAS.

Further information and resources on teaching are available on the Bok Center’s website.

Wheelchair accessible.

 

Academic Resource Center (Bureau of Study Counsel)

1414 Massachusetts Avenue, Floor 3R
(617) 495-5734
 

The Academic Resource Center (ARC) exists to empower Harvard students to reach their full academic potential. Through the ARC, students will have access to academic coaching, peer tutoring, workshops, study spaces, and other skills-based resources. They will be supported in developing reading strategies, organization and time management skills, sustainable study habits, metacognitive approaches to learning, and more.

All College and GSAS students are welcome and can access the full range of ARC services at any time. No referral is needed. Students can walk in, call, or send an email to get in touch with ARC staff.

The ARC offers four main services: Academic Coaching, Workshops, Peer Tutoring, and Study Spaces, in addition to ESL Peer Consultation.

Academic Coaching

One-on-one academic coaching consultations are available beginning Fall 2019. An academic coach can help students learn more about their ideal learning styles and environments, show them how to customize their semester, help students plan for when they are returning from leave or recovering from a concussion, and direct them to other appropriate resources on campus as needed. ARC coaches support students from all disciplines.

Workshops

ARC academic coaches will also host various workshops throughout the semester. These workshops will be centered around building and strengthening the skills necessary to succeed academically. They will cover topics including time management, strategic reading and notetaking, semester planning, problem set strategies, and more.

Peer Tutoring

The ARC oversees the Peer Tutoring program, connecting Harvard students with a network of trained peers who can support their learning in a variety of selected courses. Peer Tutors can provide an extra layer of academic support for students by reviewing critical concepts and materials from class, clarifying points of confusion, and developing study strategies for upcoming exams.

Study Spaces

The ARC offers quiet, high-tech accessible study spaces which are available for students. Students can reserve a study space through the ARC website and can also find information about other available study spaces on campus there.

ESL Peer Consultation

ARC-trained peer consultants provide support for students who speak English as a second language, offering assistance in developing speaking and listening skills, understanding local idioms, learning more about the US and Harvard cultures, or practicing for oral presentations.  Primarily for graduate students; some financial assistance is available for GSAS students and those from other schools.

For more information about the ARC or any of our services, please contact us at academicresourcecenter@harvard.edu and visit our website at academicresourcecenter.harvard.edu

 

 

Departments of the Assistive Technology Center, Instructional Media Services, Language Resource Center, and Piano Technical Services


Joya Sengupta, Senior Director of Instructional Media Services (617-495-6973) joya_sengupta@harvard.edu
The Assistive Technology Center (ATC) provides assistance for students requiring accessible education and who need technological solutions. The department of Instructional Media Services consists of three divisions -- the Media Production Center, Hauser Studio, andMedia & Technology Services -- that provide multimedia resources for graduate and undergraduate course instruction within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). The Language Center supports language instruction with a variety of multimedia resources. Piano Technical Services cares for the 200+ FAS pianos.

Assistive Technology Center 
Science Center Room B-05
Staffed: Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm
Open to registered students 24 hours daily
Email: atc@fas.harvard.edu 
617-496-8800
https://atc.fas.harvard.edu

The Assistive Technology Center (ATC) serves students with disabilities requiring technical solutions to access course materials. The ATC also demonstrates assistive technologies for members of the Harvard community. Students must be registered with the Accessible Education Office (AEO) or their graduate school's local disability coordinator before receiving services. (See Students Requiring Accessible Education.) For more information, please see the AEO website.

Wheelchair accessible.

Instructional Media Services
Media and Technology Services 
Amy Thompson, Director of Media & Technology Services, athomps@fas.harvard.edu
https://ims.fas.harvard.edu
Monday–Thursday 8 am-10 pm, Friday 8 am–5 pm (during the academic year)

Main Office:
Science Center Room B02
617-495-9460
Email: mts@fas.harvard.edu
Provides classroom technology support for all FAS locations except Sever Hall, CGIS, Northwest Building, and the Science Center (see below for support in those locations). Books videoconferences and rents portable equipment. Supports special events in all FAS locations.

CGIS Office:
CGIS South Building Room S053
617-495-9807
Email: mtscgis@fas.harvard.edu
Supports classes and events in CGIS.

Northwest Labs Office:
Northwest Labs Room B111
(617-495-5775)
Email: nwmedia@fas.harvard.edu
Supports classes and events in the Northwest Building.

Science Center Prep Room:
Science Center Room B-01
617-495-5357
Email: prep@fas.harvard.edu
Supports classes and events in the Science Center.

Sever Hall Office:
Sever Hall Room 301
617-495-9470
Email: sevmedia@fas.harvard.edu
Supports classes and events in Sever Hall.

Media and Technology Services (MTS) provides multimedia support to classes and events occurring in FAS buildings. Supported technology includes: computer and video projection; classroom computers; sound reinforcement systems; audio & video recording/editing; and web simulcasting and videoconferencing. Services include assisting FAS, Extension, and Summer School classes with classroom media equipment; lecture recording; special event support; and assistive listening systems.

Please contact MTS to arrange for services. Services are available without charge for work performed in support of Faculty of Arts & Sciences courses and course-related activities that are restricted to members of one course. For non-course activities, charges are based on the amount of labor and equipment used to perform the task.

Information on permanently installed classroom equipment and photographs of classrooms can be found at https://ims.fas.harvard.edu/.

Wheelchair accessible.

Media Production Center 
Anthony Di Bartolo, Manager of Media Production Center and Hauser Studio, dibartol@fas.harvard.edu
Rosovsky Hall (rear), 59 Plympton St.
617-495-9440
Monday–Friday 9 am–5 pm
Email: ims_mpc@fas.harvard.edu
https://ims.fas.harvard.edu/media-production

The Media Production Center (MPC) produces custom audio and video materials for teaching, outreach, and research. Our studio isequipped to record interviews, voiceovers, musical performances (Steinway grand piano on-site), on-line learning modules, and promotional video. We also provide video post-production services such as editing, titling, and color correction; location audio/musical event recording and reinforcement; audio editing, mixing, and mastering; format transfers, digitizing, and web file creation. We are happy to provide assistance and guidance to solve your audio and video media problems.

Services are available without charge for work performed in support of Faculty of Arts & Sciences courses and course-related activities that are restricted to members of one course. For non-course activities, charges are based on the amount of labor and equipment used to perform the task.

Rita E. and Gustave M. Hauser Digital Teaching & Learning Studio
Widener Library, Room G90 (Concourse Level) 
617-495-3979 
Monday-Friday 9 am- 5 pm 
Email: hauserdigitalstudio@harvard.edu
https://hauserdigitalstudio.harvard.edu/

The Hauser Studio, centrally located in Widener Library, is a state-of-the-art video capture studio that provides services for courses and related activities throughout the University. The studio is equipped to provide broadcast, HarvardX, and cinema style multi-camera production. It serves as a high-tech production facility and as a training ground for faculty throughout the University who want to experiment with new approaches to further integrate digital technology into their teaching.

Wheelchair accessible.

Language Center
Andrew Ross, PhD. Director, andrew_ross@fas.harvard.edu
Science Center B-06
617-495-9448 
Phone ahead or check the website for the most current operating hours: https://language.fas.harvard.edu/
 
The Language Center offers consulting support, technology, andlearning spaces to students and faculty in FAS world language courses and to other FAS courses using materials in languages other than English or focusing on international cultures. The Language Center provides streamed media for Canvas courses within educational fair-use guidelines, and access to textbook audio and software licensed forcourse use. The Language Center is comprised of three technology-equipped active learning classrooms for small groups, and amultipurpose area for informal language learning and events.

Wheelchair accessible, assistive listening available.

There are two screening rooms for small-group foreign-language instruction and one technology-equipped classroom for course section meetings.

Piano Technical Services 
Mariana Quinn, Manager, lincoln@fas.harvard.edu
Vanserg Hall, Piano Shop
617-495-2981
Monday–Friday 9 am–5 pm
Email: pts@fas.harvard.edu
https://pts.fas.harvard.edu

Piano Technical Services (PTS) tunes, maintains, repairs, and restores all FAS pianos and graduate school in Cambridge and Allston. We also tune FAS harpsichords. All tuning requests should be made at least five working days in advance to guarantee scheduling. Emergency requests will be considered. Please email or phone to find out if your request can be accommodated. PTS does not move or purchase instruments, or reserve or schedule practice rooms. PTS does rent pianos, please call for more information.

Wheelchair accessible.

 

Harvard University Information Technology

Harvard University Information Technology (HUIT) provides the following services and support to FAS faculty and staff. For more information, please contact huit.harvard.edu/ithelp or 617-495-7777.

Emergency Notification System

The MessageMe system lets Harvard contact you quickly in the event of an emergency. To update your contact information, visit messageme.harvard.edu.

Computer Purchases

The FAS Desktop Refresh program provides faculty with a new computer every four years.  For more information about the program, visit http://huit.harvard.edu/ithelp and enter the search term “desktop refresh.”

Working Remotely

The following resources are available to foster Harvard's work in a remote environment:

Technology for Teaching

The Academic Technology Group offers help setting up course web pages, including the Canvas learning management system; consulting on innovative uses of technology for teaching and learning; using online and mobile technologies; and developing interactive software.  Contact atg@fas.harvard.edu, atg.fas.harvard.edu, or 617-495-7777.

Technology for Research

Research Computing in the FAS is provided through divisional resources in the Arts and Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences. 

  • Arts and Humanities:  For assistance and consultation on tools and techniques for research computing, contact artshumrc@fas.harvard.edu.
  • Sciences:  FAS Research Computing provides researchers access to large-scale high-performance computing and support. Users have access to more than 100,000 CPUs and 40 petabytes of storage supporting over 500 labs and 5,500 users. For more information visit rc.fas.harvard.edu.
  • Social Sciences:  The Institute for Quantitative Social Science provides researchers access to cluster computing, software, and tools for storing data and running complex analyses. Contact www.iq.harvard.edu, help@iq.harvard.edu or 617-496-2450. 

Technology for Collaboration and Daily Use

HarvardKey:

  • Your HarvardKey and FAS account allow you to log in to your work computer, email, calendar, University websites, and departmental file shares: key.harvard.edu.

Email and Calendar:

  • To access your email and calendar, use Outlook on your computer or on the web at mso.harvard.edu (click on O365 Outlook Web App).
  • If you have been using consumer Gmail or Google Calendar for work, please use Google Apps for Harvard for improved support and privacy.  Visit g.harvard.edu.

 Individual File Sharing:

Collaborating with Colleagues:

  • MS Teams provides a collaborative workspace for departments and project groups to share communications, documents, and meetings. Visit teams.microsoft.com and login with your HarvardKey and password.
  • Google Drive is available for individual and team workspace productivity: visit g.harvard.edu.
  • Dropbox is available for faculty to share files with research collaborators on and off campus.  To request an account call 617-495-7777.
  • Harvard Link is a personalized dashboard to find Harvard events, news, colleagues, and more: visit link.harvard.edu.
  • Web publishing tools and support are available at hwp.harvard.edu or hwp@harvard.edu.

 

 

 

 

Harvard Library System

The Harvard Library 

A global leader, Harvard Library (library.harvard.edu) is an unparalleled resource for teaching, learning, and research. We are expert partners on the pathways to knowledge. We engage with our communities in the creation and sharing of new knowledge, connecting them with vast collections that we curate and steward with collaborators around the world. At its core, our mission is to advance the learning, research, and pursuit of truth that are at the heart of Harvard.

Harvard Library

 

A four-centuries old institution, Harvard Library—the administrative entity that connects collections and expert library staff across Harvard—emerged from a transformative change in 2012 that brought together a number of library operations and developed university-wide policies for collections and user services. Harvard Library is made up of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences libraries (including the Harvard College Library) and Harvard’s professional school libraries.

 

Extraordinary collections number over 20 million volumes, 400 million manuscripts, 10 million photographs, 1 million maps, and tens of millions of digital images. We collaborate in our collecting with peer institutions in ReCAP and IvyPlus, multiplying our users’ access to materials.

 

Today, Harvard’s library holdings range from traditional print collections to rapidly expanding digital resources. We provide the University’s faculty, students, and researchers—now and in the future—with comprehensive access  to the materials and resources they need.

 

Find Your Library

 

Harvard Library is a multi-library system with several locations across the University’s campus and beyond. For a complete directory of libraries and hours, including virtual hours, visit library.harvard.edu/libraries.

 

Special Collections and Archives

 

Harvard Library is home to all kinds of historical documents and objects that can enhance your research and teaching. You can connect with a range of primary sources including letters, photographs, books, scores, and digital materials.  The process for finding and accessing these rare and unique materials is different from other library materials. Use this guide to get started. 

 

Digital Collections

 

Harvard has over six million artifacts available in its digital collections. They're available to the public online, regardless of Harvard affiliation. Digitized items include images, pages from books, manuscripts, legal documents, sheet music, recipes, and much more. We have a number of curated digital collections for use.

 

Teaching Support

 

We work with faculty across the university to design classes tailored to course goals. Whether that's an online session about leveraging library resources for research in a particular topic area or using the library's special collections and archives in your teaching, we can make it happen

We also offer many resources for remote teaching, including digital course reserves, remote media help, syllabus substitutions, virtual library instruction—and more.

FAS departments have a designated library liaison who works with faculty and departments to provide access to both materials and services tailored to the work you do in your discipline.

 

Popular Library Services and Tools:

 

Ask a Librarian

Have a question about the library or about Harvard? Email, call, text, or chat with a librarian via the Ask a Librarian service.

 

Check Harvard Library Bookmark

Need access to an online article? Use this bookmarklet to get quick access to subscriptions purchased by Harvard Library.

 

Lean Library (browser extension)

The Lean Library extension provides quick and simple access to digital content purchased by Harvard Library.

 

Library catalog (HOLLIS)

HOLLIS is Harvard Library's catalog. Search HOLLIS for books, articles, media and more. If the item you're looking for is unavailable at Harvard, you may be able to borrow it directly from another library.

 

Scan & Deliver

It's a free electronic document delivery service for the Harvard community. Submit a request and we'll scan a journal article or book chapter and deliver it to you via email.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of Career Services

54 Dunster Street
Phone: 617-495-2595
Fax: 617-495-3584
www.ocs.fas.harvard.edu

The Office of Career Services (OCS) supports all students and alumni up to five years out of Harvard College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS), and degree candidates in the Harvard Extension School (HES) in exploring and making effective career and educational choices during their time at Harvard and beyond. OCS offers an extensive range of programs, resources, and advising to assist with decisions across a full range of potential interest areas including arts, entertainment, science and technology, education, government, law, media, business, and medicine. In addition, OCS assists students in exploring and planning for a wide range of domestic and international opportunities, including internships, research opportunities, summer jobs, term-time and summer international education, postgraduate employment, and graduate and professional study. The Office of Career Services administers a number of funds which support undergraduate experiences outside of the classroom.

The first floor of OCS is accessible to individuals with mobility impairments via the 52 Dunster Street entrance.

Wheelchair accessible

Office of International Education

77 Dunster Street
Phone: 617-496-2722
Fax: 617-496-2563
Email: oie@fas.harvard.edu
www.oie.fas.harvard.edu

Study Abroad

Harvard views study abroad as an invaluable part of every student's undergraduate education through encouraging students to explore the possibilities of earning degree credit by studying in another country. Details about academic year, term-time, and summer study abroad may be found on the Office of International Education (OIE) website.

From a full year, term, or even just a summer abroad, there are many ways to experience international study. Over half of Harvard College students participate in an international experience during their time as an undergraduate. The Office of International Education advises Harvard College students on all aspects related to study abroad, from preparation prior to departure and on-the-ground resources, to funding support and academic advising. The OIE works closely with each student to find a program that best matches individual academic and personal goals, while also providing guidance through the course approval and credit transfer processes.

The OIE website has extensive advising resources, including information on approved programs and universities, course and credit guidelines, FAQ’s, a calendar of events, and contact information for the OIE staff, concentration and language advisers, and students advisers and ambassadors who have recently returned from a term abroad.

Planning is key to a successful study abroad experience, so it is never too early to begin integrating study abroad into individual academic plans, seeking advice from concentration, secondary field, and/or language advisers, and visiting the Office of International Education for guidance. All students should seek assistance from the OIE as early as possible to begin planning the best study abroad experience for them. To ensure that credits from courses taken abroad will transfer back to Harvard for concentration or secondary field credit, students should work directly with the specific academic departments. If a student is seeking elective credit for a course taken abroad, the course will be reviewed by an Elective Credit Committee.

Who can Study Abroad?

Rising sophomores, juniors and seniors may participate in term-time study abroad through enrolling directly into a foreign university, participating in programs sponsored by U.S. universities, or through organizations dedicated specifically to providing high-quality study abroad programs. The OIE maintains a list of approved programs on the OIE website, which is reviewed and updated annually. If a student is interested in participating in a program that is not on the approved list, the student may petition the program through the formal petition process.

Getting Started

To begin planning, students should meet with an adviser at the OIE during drop-in hours held daily (Monday-Friday, 2 – 5 pm), or through connecting with a student adviser.  Students should consult the OIE calendar to find dates and times for recurring informational sessions as well as the wide variety of information meetings, panels, and events held throughout the year.

Procedures for Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad

Credits earned abroad are considered transfer credit, for which up to a full-year of credit (32-credits) may be earned. No more than 16-credits may be earned per term for term-time study abroad, and no more than 8-credits may be earned for summer study abroad. A total of 32-credits transfer credits may be earned from studying abroad.

Transfer credit may be earned for concentration and/or elective credit and may also contribute to a secondary field or language citation. Additionally, students may satisfy one divisional distribution requirement for one term abroad. Specific information about these options is provided on the OIE website, the General Education website (see Term Time Study Abroad), and through the undergraduate advisers in the academic departments.

Students planning to study abroad in countries where English is not the first language are encouraged to complete at least one year of study in the host country’s language before studying abroad. Additionally, as part of their academic program during each term abroad, students in non-English-speaking countries are expected to take either a language instruction course or a course taught entirely in a language of the host country.

It is expected that students who study abroad for a semester or academic year will take a full-course-load, as determined and approved by the OIE, and consistent with the College's policies. Students studying abroad during the fall or the spring term will reduce by one the number of terms for which they may register at Harvard College.

Applying for Study Abroad

Online application instructions and materials are available on the Office of International Education website.

To study abroad, students must do both of the following things:

  • Apply directly to their study abroad program or university for admission
  • Apply to the Office of International Education for transfer credit 

Applications to the OIE, for study abroad transfer credit, must be completed and submitted by the deadlines listed below:

    Term Time

  • October 1 for Spring Term study abroad
  • March 1 for Fall Term study abroad

     Summer

  • Mid-February (for students applying for both summer funding and credit
  • April 1 (for students seeking only credit) 

Students should begin the application process early, and monitor the OIE website carefully for updated or changed information. 

Online application instructions and materials are available on the OIE website. The student’s Resident Dean and departmental DUS must sign off on a student’s proposed study abroad coursework. This ensures that advising conversations take place before the student receives approval to study abroad. Students should meet with a study abroad adviser from the OIE for specific questions on this process.

To be approved for study abroad, a student must be in good academic and disciplinary standing during the term immediately preceding the proposed period of study. Unless granted permission by the Administrative Board in advance, a student cannot be granted degree credit for course work that begins when the student is on probation for any reason.

Financial Aid and Summer Funding

The only way to have a guaranteed Harvard-funded international experience is if a student is on financial aid and participates in term-time study abroad, as students eligible for financial aid may apply their financial aid award to their term-time study abroad experience. A student’s financial aid package may be used to pay for term-time study abroad, including tuition, room and board, program and visa fees, books, airfare, and other living expenses. Students eligible for financial aid should consult their designated financial aid officer for more detailed information.

All students earning credit abroad during the academic year will be charged the student services fee on their Harvard College term-bill. Students will also be billed automatically for health insurance, which may be waived with proof of comparable coverage by the designated deadline.

Students abroad will maintain their HarvardKey, thus retaining access to Harvard libraries and services.

Students may consult the Office of Career Services, and the Funding Sources Database for more information about summer funding opportunities.

Harvard does not ordinarily grant credit for study out of residence at other U.S. institutions, except in rare cases when such study is judged to offer a “special opportunity” unavailable to the student at Harvard. Information on the process for petitioning for credit for study out of residence within the U.S. can be obtained from the student’s Resident Dean of Freshmen or Resident Dean; if the student’s petition is approved by the Administrative Board, the OIE will be notified by the appropriate Dean and will instruct the student on how to apply for transfer credit.

 

Undergraduate Research

Office of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships (URAF)

77 Dunster Street (corner of Dunster and South Streets)
Phone: 617-495-5095
Email: undergradresearch@fas.harvard.edu
Website: http://uraf.harvard.edu

The Office of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships (URAF) serves as the hub for institution-wide policies, practices and funding related to undergraduate research; the development and implementation of College-based programs such as the Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village and the Program for Research in Science and Engineering (PRISE); and the management of postgraduate fellowships and prestigious national competitions (such as Rhodes, Marshall, and Fulbright). In addition, in conjunction with Admissions and Financial Aid, OCS, OIE, the FAS Office of Science Education, and other collaborative academic and affiliated research enterprises, URAF provides advising, resource materials, and seminars about the full range of research opportunities, research funding, and fellowships locally (university-wide), domestically, and internationally.

 

 

Writing Center

Barker Center 019
Phone: 617-495-1655
Email: writingcenter@fas.harvard.edu
https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/

The Writing Center offers free one-on-one writing help to all undergraduate students. Instructors may recommend the Writing Center to students who need help with argument, structure, and clarity in academic writing. An English Grammar and Language tutor is also available to assist students with grammar and syntax. The Writing Center website also features handouts about academic writing and a link to the Harvard Guide to Using Sources, an online publication that explains how to use sources effectively and how to avoid plagiarism.

Wheelchair accessible.

 

COVID-19 Emergency Policies Fall 2020

 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Committee on Undergraduate Educational Policy (EPC) announced updates to certain Student Handbook policies. Below are those updates.

July 15, 2020: International Student Study Away Fall 2020

During academic year 2020-21 Harvard College international students may earn credit for work done at a local university in their country of residence. Institutions must be accredited and able to provide an official transcript or grade report upon completion of the term. All courses must adhere to a liberal arts and sciences curriculum and may not be pre-professional in nature. Earning credit for such study away will follow the same credit transfer policies as those applicable to study abroad.

For detailed information about study away, please visit the Office of International Education website.

August 12, 2020: Privacy Policy

The circumstances of remote teaching and learning require clear guidelines about the recording of class sessions by students and instructors. Course content and materials may be covered by copyrights held by the University or the instructor, and their unauthorized use may violate such copyrights as well as the privacy of other students in the course.

An overview of the University's privacy and recording guidance is here (and in more detail here).

Instructor Recordings

Instructors are encouraged to record course sessions to provide robust options for students in distant time zones without requiring them to attend live class meetings before 7:15 am or after 10:30 pm in their local time zone, and may also record course sessions to make them available for use later in the semester.

Students and instructors have reasonable expectations of privacy in regard to interactions in class as captured in such recordings. Further, recordings in which students are personally identifiable are subject to FERPA rules governing their distribution. For these reasons, course recordings should be made available on the Canvas site behind HarvardKey login so that they are available only to registered students and other members of the course community.

Student Publishing or Distribution of Course Materials

By attending course sessions remotely and accessing course recordings, students acknowledge that they may not post, publish, sell, or otherwise publicly distribute course materials without the written permission of the course instructor. Such materials include, but are not limited to, the following: video or audio recordings, assignments, problem sets, examinations, other students’ work, and answer keys.

Students who sell, post, publish, or distribute course materials without written permission, whether for the purposes of soliciting answers or otherwise, may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including requirement to withdraw from the College. Further, students may not make video or audio recordings of class sessions for their own use without written permission of the instructor.

Students needing course recordings as an accommodation should contact the Accessible Education Office (AEO).

August 13, 2020: Simultaneous Enrollment

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all Harvard courses will be offered remotely, and many will offer options for students to view recorded lectures and engage synchronously with other elements of the course. As a result of this pedagogical shift, the faculty legislated policy on simultaneous enrollment will be suspended for the duration of remote teaching and learning. Students will be responsible for developing a reasonable schedule that will allow for attendance during all required synchronous components of each course.

 

Archives

Faculty Handbook 2019-2020449 KB
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Faculty Handbook 2013-20141.59 MB
Faculty Handbook 2012-20131.62 MB
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